As part of our work with Orange, at a Group level, we’ve recently been involved in the launch of Mobile Exposure 2010 research and the launch of a new tool for advertisers – the Orange Mobile Targeting Monitor.

We wanted to share the research findings on the Pheasant for a couple of reasons:

  • The data is interesting from a tech point of view.  It reveals what content mobile media users in the UK, France, Poland and Spain are engaging with and when.   Of particular note is how applications are sitting alongside the mobile browser.  The research is a bit of a bench mark, so as Smartphone penetration grows it will be interesting to see how this usage evolves.
  • The advertising tool highlights the insight that is used to build advertising campaigns.  As I said in a post last week, PRs need to continue to use data to inform our thinking

Included here is a deck with the key research highlights.  If this subject is particularly of interest to you – then whiz over to the Orange micro-site to read and view more.

@LukeMackay

*just in case the above isn’t clear….  Disclaimer: Orange is a client, and I work on the account.  Our team was involved in the creation of some of the Exposure 2010 materials*

Advertisements

Data vis As information technology has grown, so has the impact of data on our lives. I’m calling this the new dicdataship. As data performs an increasingly important role in business, so too will it impact the work of the PR.

A few bits of data that have caught my eye in the last week or so:

  • The Sydney Morning Herald ran a story this week about the new industry that has emerged from the bulging data market (did I mention I’m in Sydney…). Data is valuable, so people are selling it. This is, I’m sure you’ll agree, a little bit unnerving. I’m sure most consumers would be upset to find out that their online habits are being tracked, and even more so that someone else is benefitting financially. Increasingly I’m sure we will be working with clients who either want to reassure customers that they are not selling their data, or indeed if they are selling it – that they are doing so responsibly. 
  • Wired is one of the historic champions of data, as is Guardian Technology whose Free Our Data campaign has been running for years. There is an awful lot of public data that isn’t public. Imagine what your commute would be like if TFL shared their data in real time, so you could avoid the trouble hotspots?
  • The Orange Group team at Edelman has spent the last few weeks working with Orange on the launch of their Orange Mobile Targeting Monitor and Exposure 2010 research. This tool will help advertisers better plan mobile marketing campaigns as the data gives real insight into current mobile behaviours. Check the microsite for more info.
  • We work with Last.fm who has a heritage in open APIs and data access. This awesome visualisation was recently developed to illustrate a listener’s daily musical habits.

So why have I suddenly got the data shakes? Well three fold:

  • The first two stories show that this is a pressing consumer issue. It may not be fully mainstream yet, but Joe Public will become increasingly concerned about what is done with his personal data. We have a responsibility to encourage the companies we work with to behave as transparently and responsibly as possible. 
  • The Orange Exposure research shows how advertisers and brands can use data to create more relevant conversations with consumers. As PRs we should also be looking at how data can inform the campaigns we build.
  • The Last.fm story shows how much fun can be had from data. Whether an infographic, a nifty visualisation, or a game. There’s a lot of potential both for creative, and informative builds.

If I look around at my PR peers, most of us come from an arts background. We studied literature, philosophy or history; we realised we were pretty good with words but journalists don’t get paid very well; we fell into PR. Erudite prose, charm and wit have got us thus far. I for one am rubbish with numbers. I suspect as our industry evolves alongside the rising dominance of data that it might be necessary for us to get a few more mathematicians in the room.

@LukeMackay

Festival season is about to kick off and while wellies and wet wipes are flying off the shelves, brands are adding the finishing touches to corporate sponsorship, sales promotions and experiential marketing activities.

Festivals have become synonymous with brands over the past five years or so. Set on captivating the more technologically savvy, informed and trendy Generation Y, festivals present a unique opportunity to engage with this audience. But with many brands playing a similar game and sharing a strong desire to be present, many miss the point of engagement and turn their presence into nothing more than a badging exercise which doesn’t bode well for festival-goers. On a commercial level it also begs the question as to whether the investment is really worth it?

Festival commercialism has always been a touchy subject for music lovers. Set on the view that festivals should be all about the music, cynicism has often arisen around disconnected brand alignments and perceived fake sentiment which can leave a sour taste in consumers’ mouths. Finding a balance is important as brand overkill without a clear purpose, value or audience benefit just isn’t going to fit the bill. This is where I think technology brands have a unique advantage due to their potential to connect on a more emotional level with an audience compared to the average drinks brand, for instance, and provide greater value through a more integrated experience.

Orange, for example, has constantly built on its Chill ‘n’ Charge tent idea at Glastonbury ever since its launch in 2002. Each year it has given its constantly connected audience the power to stay in touch with friends by providing free mobile phone charging facilities, downloadable apps to locate your friends and tent and free broadband services to enable users to upload and share photos online. imageThis year it has boosted its green credentials, another issue close to the hearts of Generation Y, through the launch its eco-friendly mobile phone charging prototype – Orange Power Wellies. The brand has also continued to build on its music credentials outside festival season through its Orange Rock Corps initiative.

To avoid homogenisation and potential negative sentiment, brands need to think more creatively about audience engagement and steer away from strategies of brash visibility and quick wins. To make the most of the investment they should consider the potential of creating more long-term relationships with audiences and find new ways of connecting on another level which strikes an emotional cord too.

N.B. Although Orange is a client of Edelman, we do not work on the Chill ‘n’ Charge project mentioned above.

@LucyDesaDavies