So I guess Tron was the pretty much the first film to tell of how a person went into a digital world completed a quest and then returned to the real world. If you know of any other others let me know.

For the launch of our client’s ePrint product we played with this concept firstly using architectural mapping to create an augmented reality display at the South Bank . We then tried to create play with some of the TRON: Legacy imagery to create a visual experience that could be both printed and posted onto the web.

The idea was to highlight how the web is not just encroaching into the external world  but creating links back and forth using wireless printing and posting to social networks. The ‘outernet’ is a phenomena still in it’s infancy but it is certainly fun to investigate. _ABU9234, 9234

_ABU9336, 9336

@naked_pheasant

How do you ensure that your limited time and resources is spent using social media effectively? The answer is not as many people often believe.

The current view is to try and engage purely with the superstars of the twittersphere in the hope that they will repeat your name/message and promote you. This is timely, expensive and rarely succeeds.

The other method I have seen used is to hit everyone who refers to a specific term. Having a search filter setup for key words and then conversing with anyone who mentions your key terms is a sure fire way to spend a great deal of time with people who have limited influence. In an ideal world, this would be great but many firms do not have the time to spend engaging with everyone. The cynical part of me believes that this approach is often used purely to hit metrics on report cards, i doubt that savvy people will allow this approach to go on for much longer.

Instead, my view is to focus on those people that are influentials. The people who create and share ideas as oppose to merely broadcast.

I presented on this topic a few weeks ago at BrightTalk – if you’d like to see my presentation you can do so below.

You wouldn't though, would you?

You wouldn't though, would you?

It’s not an original observation to say that the rise of social media and networking has paved the way a breed of self-obsessed, self serving, egoists. And whilst that might be the extreme end of the spectrum, it’s hard to deny that we have adopted a culture where we are continually encouraged to ‘broadcast yourself’.

We all know why it has proved to be so popular, we’re inherently nosey and want to know instantly what our family/peers/crushes are getting up to, wherever they happen to be and vice versa. Social networking is the perfect tool to do this.

Plus, it has also given people the chance to move out of obscurity and into the limelight. Scantily clad girls and women are plastered across profile pages everywhere – social networking sites these days often look like the equivalent of a third division Miss World contest. The words of Bros, ‘when will I be famous’ ring in my ears…

What are the consequences of this self promotion? One is to give airtime (and I’m sure a huge pay packet) to the likes of Tila Tequila, ‘the most popular artist’ on MySpace. Tila’s antics I’m sure will inspire other young ladies to follow her example in bid to be recognised as a sex symbol on a global level. Sadly, these D level celebrities used to be confined to their national borders, but we have technology to thank for their springboard to stardom. Social media has the ability for an individual to reach people across the world and make them an international phenomenon.

But even if fame isn’t on the agenda – what is? Why are people so willing to be poked by people they don’t know? Technology has given us a new forum to meet people, and social networks are a safe haven to promote our better assets and also hide our unattractive traits. Let’s hope there aren’t any nasty surprises when you take things offline and into the real world! For 2009 the online dating industry is expected to top $1.049 billion and is likely to grow at a rate of 10 percent. These stats support that technology has opened the flood gates for singletons, ready to find love, or simply get a leg over.

Recently asked in the Evening Standard- respondents were asked if they would you use Facebook to get sex – where a number of them answered yes. It begs the question, has technology made us more daring, or simply more desperate?

Against our better judgements, it’s not uncommon to befriend people online we don’t know- the caution we would use in our everyday lives is somehow forgotten. Maybe it’s the stroking of egos, or just the fun of flirting, but striking up ‘friendships’ with strangers online is a growing trend. But all this talk of me, me, me, means that actually you might be playing into the hands of someone more sinister. When you think of online predators, we can be quick to dismiss that we’re not at risk. But, the fact that sex offenders in Illinois have been prohibited from using social networking sites goes to show that social networks are places where victims are identified, targeted and also where personal information can be obtained and used against you.

From a personal experience, posting even the most minor piece of information duped me talking to someone I don’t know online. I thought I knew ‘John Taylor’ who befriended me on Facebook, through university. We shared the same city and some friends, so when he struck up a conversation I assumed we might know each other. It didn’t take too long for me to find out actually, I had no relation to this person at all – and in fact – he was messaging me from a prison cell!

Despite technology giving us the chance to bridge the physical distance between people, it also gives people enough distance to do things they might not dare to do when face-to-face. Would John Taylor be so brave to start chatting to me online if we met in the street? Doubtful given his current housing situation…

It’s scarily easy to obtain personal information through social networking sites, and then be duped into believing you know whoever approaches you. Tech News World reported that if you’re not careful, scammers can obtain enough information about you to rip you off. And according to research from PC World, it is estimated with free dating sites at least 10 percent of new accounts created each day are from scammers.

The secondary consequence of all this self promotion means that cyber-criminals can easily find out where you live, where you work, what tube you get, what parties you’ve been too – all making a very believable story that a stalker could actually know you.

There are some things you can’t control about the internet; the rise of talentless, fame hungry, desperate and horny people are some of them, but something you can control is what you post online about yourself. It’s just a matter of modesty – broadcast yourself, but just not too much.

Pam Chowdhury (currently not on twitter… yes, yes we know… we’re working on that)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 30 other followers