Last week, an all too familiar story: Marisa, from the Barcelona office, had her husband come home from work with lousy news.  Due to an out of town workshop (on a Saturday!!) she would have to reschedule a well-planned dinner at St. Pau located seaside near Barcelona.  Normally Marisa is pretty flexible with these things but this was special – in 2008 St. Pau was awarded three Michelin Stars!

So, as Valentine´s Day approaches we wondered how many people are facing similar situations and how they plan to compensate their loved ones for their absence, especially those attending the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona from the 14-18 of February. Over 50,000 delegates and visitors are anticipated to attend this year’s conference and exhibition, which means many postponed celebrations and cancelled dinners – although hopefully not at three Michelin Star restaurants.

To keep with the technology themed Mobile World Congress we sent out a survey to find out just how people would use technology to compensate their loved ones in the event of their absence on Valentine´s Day. 

It turns out that women more often turn to one-to-one communications and men prefer to ‘broadcast’ their affections.  According to the survey, 59% more women than men would use Skype with video service or equivalent to call their partner and  67% more women than men would send a personal video message via email while out of town.  Male respondents to the survey invariably preferred the one-to-many approach with 70% more men than women proposing to dedicate a Twitter post to their other half.

The survey also produced some interesting country differences, with Spanish respondents demonstrating the highest levels of ingenuity with the use of newer technology; 50% of Spanish respondents would probably or certainly use Skype with video or equivalent to communicate their sentiments if absent on Saint Valentine’s Day compared to a global average of 29%, while over a third of Spaniards would send a personalised video from their mobile phone (compared to a global average of just 13%). 

The least romantic nation in technology terms is Ireland!  According to the survey, 67% of Irish respondents wouldn’t even send a text message to their partner if absent during Saint Valentine’s Day, against a global average of 42%.

It is clear that technology is embedded in our lives and according to our survey can play a key role in keeping your significant other satisfied in the event of an absence.  So, do you think that texting isn’t very romantic, but it is the thought that counts?  Have you or your significant other ever used technology in a creative way to show how much you care?  How would you use technology to communicate your absence on Valentine’s Day?

If you had to work away from home during Saint Valentine’s Day, how would you use technology to make it up to your partner?

Over the next few weeks, Edelman’s European Technology Practice is embarking on a mission to explore one of the biggest questions currently facing the world of commerce and enterprise.

With clients and colleagues confronted by increasing pressures and workloads, the challenge of managing a stable ‘work-life’ balance has never been more acute.  So we’re running a survey.  Log on now and make your voice heard.

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