Being a member of the Edelman Tech Team provides a constant challenge, no two days are ever the same and you will learn to expect the unexpected.

You need to always be up to date with the latest industry news and developments. My favourite part of the day is the morning paper rounds, reminiscent of BBC Breakfast’s news round up, which helps to keep you up to date with all the latest industry news and development. Part of my daily role also includes account support, liaising with journalists, pitching media stories, proactively news jacking and reporting.

Since I have been here I have worked with a broad range of clients including HP, LinkedIn, SocialVibe and Norton. Because of the range of clients that the Edelman Technology team represents, the work is very varied. So far I have worked on social media programmes, proactively sourced product placement opportunities and helped to introduce start ups to the UK media. The diverse interests and partnerships of our clients mean that although you will be based at the centre of technology you will begin to learn about other aspects of the media industry, from mainstream consumer PR to public affairs and digital. Last week was particularly busy and part of my role included inviting press to a David Guetta event and following up on some work we had undertaken with the Prime Minister.

Edelman takes the development of their employees seriously and the company runs some great training sessions with industry experts. So far, I’ve attended session on issues as far reaching as crisis management, analyst relations and brand strategy which has helped to provide me with invaluable insight into the media industry.

@CamillaEClarke

Every year industry analysts formally put their reputation on the line and make predictions for the next 12 months. This post aims to summarise their views in one place – I recommend you click on the links by each post if you want to read more detail.

And for a bit of fun, why don’t you also compare how they did last year on this post

Firms included are: Irregular Enterprise, Gartner, Ovum, CCS Insight, Nucleus Research, HfS,  Infotrends, Quocirca, IHS Screen Digest, Forrester

 

Irregular Enterprise

(In my opinion, this list is the most accurate)

  1. 2011 will be like 2010 only more so.
  2. Collaboration will be big. Somewhere.
  3. It will be increasingly cloudy. Especially in Manchester, north west England where they get 300 days of rain a year. Elsewhere, the IT media will be buried in cloudy press releases.
  4. Industry analysts wont revisit their 2010 predictions without massaging what they said before. Almost nobody will notice except those who keep an eye on quantitative analyses and call bull on the numbers.
  5. Industry analysts that got more than 10% of their predictions right will crow over their ability to predict the future. Nobody else will care.
  6. Industry analysts will make bold predictions for 2011 based on their current research agendas. Vendors whose offerings align will sign away millions in wasted ‘research.’
  7. Software will conclusively prove that cows are the biggest contributors to greenhouse gases. The ensuing bovine cull will ensure population starvation on a massive scale thus solving our climate change issues. Those flogging carbon solutions will be put out of business.
  8. Someone will insert an RSS enabled RFID device into Mark Zuckerberg’s rectum so that we all get to know what he really thinks about privacy. As a result, Zuck will have to endure a TSA pat down but will opt to be processed in a private area. That won’t prevent any of us from knowing what’s going on while enterprise security experts study the resultant data stream with interest.
  9. Social business consultants will win huge government contracts – to be executed from padded cells over the next 25 years. People like me will be relieved that the madness of social business has been correctly allocated the appropriate resources.
  10. Social media will suffer a backlash (oops – it’s already happened but the social media mavens didn’t notice. This is just to keep them up to speed.)

 

Top Predictions for IT Organizations and Users for 2011 and Beyond

  1. By 2015, a G20 nation’s critical infrastructure will be disrupted and damaged by online sabotage.
  2. By 2015, new revenue generated each year by IT will determine the annual compensation of most new Global 2000 CIOs.
  3. By 2015, information-smart businesses will increase recognized IT spending per head by 60 per cent.
  4. By 2015, tools and automation will eliminate 25 per cent of labor hours associated with IT services.
  5. By 2015, 20 per cent of non-IT Global 500 companies will be cloud service providers.
  6. By 2014, 90 per cent of organizations will support corporate applications on personal devices.
  7. By 2013, 80 per cent of businesses will support a workforce using tablets.
  8. By 2015, 10 per cent of your online "friends" will be nonhuman.

The top ten enterprise IT trends for 2011

Security, cloud services and sustainability will be three of the most important trends in enterprise IT in 2011, according to Ovum.

  1. Security – Security continues to be high on the IT agenda as the number of threats to businesses increases rapidly.
  2. Data management – Data management will be a key area due to the sheer volumes now passing through enterprises.
  3. Business analytics – Business analytics will remain an important tool for organisations that want to differentiate themselves from the competition in 2011
  4. Mobility – In IT management, the mobility challenge in 2011 will be to embrace the new technology while developing a strategy that maintains a balance between user preference and productivity and corporate security and compliance.
  5. Data centre transformation – The role of the data centre is witnessing a dramatic shift as the cloud computing era heralds a new dawn in the delivery of IT services in 2011.
  6. Cloud services – Cloud computing will continue to grow steadily in 2011.
  7. Collaboration – To cater for changes in work practices, an integrated approach to collaboration is needed which includes social networking and video conferencing.
  8. Sustainability – New opportunities will continue to emerge in 2011 which allow organisations to work in a more environmentally-friendly way.
  9. IT financial management – The CIO should talk the language of business and put in place better IT financial management in 2011.
  10. Context-aware computing – In 2011, CIOs should be looking to instrumentation, metering and wireless technologies to play a significant role in providing the context which can lead to automated business processes and increased productivity.

CCS Insight Predictions for 2011 and Beyond

(full summary can be downloaded here)

 

  1. Apple buys TomTom.
  2. Huawei’s Ideos brand will enter the top five manufacturers by 2015.
  3. Nintendo will launch "DS Mobile", a connected portable gaming device, by 2012.
  4. 3D becomes a major theme on mobile devices in 2011 but mobile 3D displays flatter to deceive.
  5. In 2012 Apple unveils the "iScreen", a connected screen for the home.
  6. Tablets will fail to live up to the hype.
  7. Facebook buys Skype and launches a calling service within its mobile applications.
  8. Concern grows over addiction to mobile devices, particularly among the under-25s.
  9. Operators will focus on speed and quality of service rather than number of gigabytes when marketing mobile data.
  10. Operators will pay subsidies based on the data efficiency of a software platform, favouring BlackBerry over iOS and Android.
  11. Chrome OS becomes a "problem child" for Google
  12. MeeGo’s early successes will not come from mobile phones.

Nucleus Research

Nucleus Research Technology Predictions

 

  1. Oracle and IBM are the last ones standing, going head-to-head after enterprise software partners and/or acquisitions.
  2. Microsoft needs an inspiring visionary or a tactical general. Steve Ballmer should go.
  3. Smaller vendors with specialized expertise that deliver value to customers continue to thrive.
  4. Google needs to actually finish products and not just gravitate to the next big thing.
  5. HP needs to get beyond boardroom scuffles and define itself in the modern software world.
  6. SAP will shrink as companies now have credible alternatives (Oracle, NetSuite, and others).
  7. Politicians are out of touch with the realities of IT. The cloud enables white-collar workers to work anywhere, allowing smart companies to seek locales with low taxes and overhead.
  8. No more social networking nonsense, as organizations move employees away from social sites at work.
  9. The cloud changes everything – still. Companies large and small are taking advantage of the economic and environmental advantages of developing and computing in the cloud.
  10. AT&T provides a valuable lesson on how a lack of customer service and inability to address service issues can cause customers to band together through the Internet with a powerful and collective voice

HfS – Horses for Sources Predictions

 

  1. The outsourcing industry will see the first Cowboy and Indian mega-merger
  2. BPO uptake will creep back throughout 2011, as the recovery stutters and buyers pull the trigger on sourcing initiatives, however, many of the deals for the first-time buyer will be small in scope
  3. IT Outsourcing will have a banner year as market peaks, however growth will tail-off towards year-end as wage-arbitrage begins to become saturated
  4. Service integration becomes the new fad, replacing innovation as the buzzword of the day
  5. Service providers will start to break out of vertical silos to help their clients collaborate
  6. Integrated offerings from service providers with broad capability gain market share. Distinction between BPO and ITO blurs
  7. Many CIOs will thrive or fail because of Cloud demand from their business function leaders
  8. Successful advisors shift their business models to be "lighter" or more full featured
  9. Onshore and nearshore alternatives hit the mainstream
  10. HfS Research will achieve world-domination

Technology predictions from Zac Butcher

·

  1. Continued economic uncertainty; the global economy is the major issue for business in 2011, austerity measures in Europe impacting public sector key account business and confidence in general
  2. Cloud printing (or a similar term) to become the next big thing in the printing industry – we’re going to start moving beyond MPS and the hubbub around MPS – companies will begin to realise that the underlying theme is the mobility of the knowledge worker and that business processes, of which the majority still involve paper somewhere along the line, will need to adapt, evolve and maybe be totally reinvented for the next computing age
  3. Greater range of iPad competitor products will slowly begin to erode printed pages further – screen reading at the outset and moving more towards video consumption of content longer term

Technology predictions from Clive Longbottom

  1. The cloud will burst – initial attempts by many companies to adopt cloud will show some of the issues – latency, service levels, lack of predictability will all make organisations wonder if cloud is all it has been built up to be.  There will then be a strong drive for an agreed means of standardising technical contracts on the fly and for monitoring and managing performance across private, and to a lesser extent, public clouds.  This does not bring cloud down – it just slows it down while the reality sets in and expectations are reset.
  2. Consolidation continues. The changing nature of IT continues to stress large and small IT vendors, and acquisitions continue for those with deep pockets, mergers for those in trouble, and failure for some.  Even large companies can fail (see Novell for this year’s big one).  The focus will have to be on agility and flexibility – not massive, semi-monolithic applications.
  3. The IT department struggles. Old-style outsourcing where IT departments found themselves in fear of having their employer change under them, or in possibly losing their job, becomes new-style outsourcing, looking to utilise functions from the cloud.  Jobs will just be lost – the cloud takes over the complete function, and the new IT department has to be able to act as the translator between what the business needs and where those functions are best served from.  This is  not a grease-monkey technical job – it is a business/technical architect job, and many IT people will suffer in the fall out.  However, the cloudburst mentioned above will give some succour – when cloud is seen as a failure, the functions will have to be pulled back in again, and the hyper-techie will have their part to play again.  Unfortunately, this will be short lived, and many organisations will not have the capability to deal with the "boom and bust" movement from in-house data centre to hybrid cloud and back again in a manner that enables the business to survive.
  4. Sustainability is back on the agenda.  Not because big business wants to save the world – but because governments need to raise money.  Green is the new tax – governments will be finding ways to screw as much out of businesses as they possibly can through as many means as possible, and taxing what will be defined as profligate use of energy is a great way of bringing in money.  IT will be a focus again – but the clever IT department will move the focus to how IT can help the overall organisation to better manage its overall energy footprint – not just focusing on how the data centre can cut back on its energy use by 5-10%.
  5. Thin-client computing (by any name) becomes far more mainstream. Any company that does this for cost purposes or for energy saving purposes deserves everything that happens to them.  However, to enable a better control and information security environment, to better support mobile workers and to ensure better overall security across a mixed estate of company and personal access devices, centralising the desktop in a data centre will be seen as making more and more sense.
  6. Consumerisation overtakes the business.  Any business now trying to turn back the tide of employees wanting their own devices to be supported will lose. Devices ranging from the enterprise-focused, such as RIM Blackberries, through avowedly consumer focused iPad and the newer Android/PalmOS/Windows 7 slates, tablets and other form factor systems will no longer be centrally sourced by the organisation, but will be expensed by the employee.  These systems will have to be accepted and managed by IT – even if "managing" them means just providing a sandboxed environment for the corporate desktop to run in.
  7. Social networking continues to confuse, bemuse and amuse. Facebook continues its world domination,  Twitter fades somewhat as people begin to see its limitations.  MySpace probably fades to a greater extent.  FourSquare makes some inroads for a while – but is not a long term bet.  Organisations continue to struggle in figuring out just exactly how to play the social networking field. Employees continue to place inappropriate comments that hit headlines and embarrass businesses, resulting in knee-jerk reactions that end up in court for dealing with employee grievances.
  8. The iPhone 5 gets announced on April 1st. It will have a 24MP camera with a 3MP secondary one.  It will have a 3D screen, which, using the Retina capability and special glasses, will give the appearance of an IMAX experience while you are sat on the underground.  It will make a leap to 6 TB memory – just enough for your average 14 year old to store all their MP3 and JPEG files.  It will not be compatible with Flash – or with the Microsoft Kinect controller. Steve Jobs is also rumoured to be talking to telecoms companies about making sure that the iPhone5 will not be able to interoperate with any device on the same network that runs Microsoft Windows Phone 7.  According to his Fanboys, this is a necessary step to stop the evil dictatorship of Ballmer from placing the world under the shackles of a closed operating system with little support for external capabilities and with little overall usage due to short battery life.  After all, that is Steve’s job.

imageJulien Theys from IHS Screen Digest

 

  1. Nokia will have to deliver with MeeGo if it doesn’t want to be written off in the smartphone innovation race. Their current strategy will have to translate into financial gains or face a reboot by 2012.
  2. Android will keep growing and outselling iPhone although the comparison will remain irrelevant (and mildly irritating). Android will speed up the democratisation and commoditisation of a significant share of the smartphone market. Some hardware manufacturers relying too much on Android will suffer from this. Poor quality handsets and fragmentation will hurt the Android brand. Unofficial, unsupported and sub-par Android variants will creep up and there is very little that Google will be able to do about it. Tablets will only make it worse.
  3. Out of the two Korean giants, Samsung will have a much better 2011 than LG, mobile-wise.
  4. Growth year for Apple, with emphasis on multi-touch and evolutionary improvements across the board: Apps on Apple TV, CDMA iPhone, iPad 2. 2011 should offer a rather weak competition for iPad. iPod should decline significantly but Apple will keep milking the (mostly unchallenged) cow until its last breath.
  5. I still do not see the brands ‘Playstation’ and ‘Sony Ericsson’ coexist on the upcoming gaming-oriented handset. A new sub-brand would be wiser.
  6. RIM will have a hard time sustaining their growth rate.
  7. Mobile payment should be the hot topic in many countries, with many stakeholders likely to move aggressively. One more area in which Nokia had a head start that might ultimately prove useless.
  8. Big tickets M&A are most likely to involve companies such as Microsoft, Nokia and RIM.
  9. Skype is a prime acquisition candidate.
  10. Google and Apple are likely to stick with their current strategy of incremental smaller-scale IP/talent acquisitions.
  11. Potential let downs: Google TV, Chrome OS and BlackBerry Playbook will all be tough sells.
  12. Certain let downs: augmented reality, location-based gaming.

James Staten gives his cloud predictions

 

  1. And The Empowered Shall Lead Us. In Forrester’s new book Empowered, we profile a new type of IT leader, and they don’t work for you. They work for the business, not I&O, and are leveraging technologies at the edge of the business to change relationships, improve customer support, design new products, and deliver value in ways you could not have foreseen. And, despite your “better judgment” you need to help them do this. Your frontline employees are the ones who see the change in the market first and are best positioned to guide the business on how to adjust. They can turn — and are turning — to cloud services to make this change happen but don’t always know how to leverage it best. This is where you must engage.
  2. You will build a private cloud, and it will fail. And this is a good thing. Because through this failure you will learn what it really takes to operate a cloud environment. Knowing this, your strategy should be to fail fast and fail quietly. Don’t take on a highly visible or wildly ambitious cloud effort. Start small, learn, iterate, and then expand
  3. Hosted private clouds will outnumber internal clouds 3:1. The top reason empowered employees go to public cloud services is speed. They can gain access to these services in minutes. Private clouds must meet this demand and not once, but consistently. That means standardized procedures executed by automation software, not hero VMware administrators. And most enterprises aren’t ready to pass the baton. But service providers will be ready in 2011. This is your fast path to private cloud, so take it.
  4. Community clouds will arrive, thank to compliance. The biotech field is already heading this direction. Federal government I&O teams are piloting them. And security and compliance will bring them together. Why struggle alone adapting your processes to meet FDA requirements when everyone else in your industry is doing the same? Cmed Technology is onto something here.
  5. Workstation applications will bring HPC to the masses. Autodesk’s Project Cumulus and the ISVs lining up behind GreenButton are showing the way, and they’ll do it because it expands — not threatens — their market. Both these companies have figured out how to put a cloud behind applications and in so doing deliver game-changing productivity: the kind of performance that can potentially match traditional grid computing but with nearly no effort by the customer. These moves leverage cloud economics and may disrupt supercomputing.
  6. Cloud economics gets switched on. Being cheap is good. We all know the basic of cloud economics — pay only for what you use — but the mechanism isn’t the lesson; it’s just the tool. Cloud economics 101 is matching elastic applications to cloud platforms and moving transient apps in and out so their costs are constantly returning to zero. Cloud economics 201 is designing and optimizing applications to take greatest advantage. Cloud economics 301 is knowing when and which cloud to use for maximum profitability. Look to early efforts such as Amazon Web Services’ Spot Instances andEnomaly’s SpotCloud to show the way here and the Cloud Price Calculator to help you normalize costs. As cloud segments such as IaaS commoditize, tools that let you play the market will grow in importance.
  7. The BI gap will widen. If business intelligence to you means a secure data warehouse, you will quickly learn which side of this gap you are on. Cloud technologies such as AWS’ Elastic Map Reduce, 1010Data, and BI unification will deliver real-time intelligence and cross-system insights that help businesses skate to where the puck is going and see — and make — the market shift before their competitors.
  8. Information is power and a new profit center. Not only will cloud computing help leading enterprises gain greater insight from their information, it will help them derive revenue from it too. Services such as Windows Azure DataMarket will help enterprises leverage data sources more easily and become one of those providers themselves. The Associated Press, Dun & Bradstreet, and ESRI are the model. Are you the next great provider? What value data are you keeping locked up in your vault?
  9. Cloud standards still won’t be here — get over it. Despite promising efforts by the DMTF, NIST, and the Cloud Security Alliance, this market will still be too immature for standardization. But that won’t mean a lack of progress in 2011. Expect draft specifications and even a possible ratification or two next year, but adoption of the standard will remain years off. Don’t let that hold you back from using cloud technologies, though, as most are built on the backs of prior standards efforts. Existing security, Web services, networking, and protocol standards are all in use by clouds. And cloud management tools are doing their best to abstract the difference from cloud to cloud.
  10. Cloud security will be proven but not by the providers alone. Because cloud security isn’t their responsibility —it’s shared. The cloud-leading enterprises get this, and we have already seen HIPAA, PCI, and other compliance standards met in the cloud. The cloud providers are certainly doing their part as evidenced by AWS’s recent ISO 27001 certification. The best practices for doing this will spread in 2011, but we should all remember that you shouldn’t hold off on cloud computing until you solve these high-bar security challenges. Get started with applications that are easier to protect.

Originally posted on Technobabble 2.0

When Ray Wang explains the thinking behind the newest analyst firm on the market, a few words are frequently used:

Disruption –  Experience – Research

These areas are at the crux of what Constellation Research is about and are probably the reasons why I believe that they will automatically be listed as a Tier One firm – something that is critical if they are to survive.

Disruption

Ray clearly states that they will partner with their clients to:

Guide buyers through a dizzying array of disruptive business models and technologies

The words that jump out at me here are ‘buyers’ and ‘disruption’.  This firm has a focus on end users – this is nirvana for vendors and something that many peers in the industry aspire to have in their client base. The objective is to have 70% buy-side business which considering they are starting day 0 with this number at 60% makes me believe that this isn’t wishful thinking.

The focus on disruptive technologies is prudent – whereas there are hundreds of analysts covering every aspect of technology, Ray has pragmatically realised that there is a need to bring order to chaos and advise people on trends, buyers’ POV and  technology in an independent and objective fashion.

Their disruptive and innovation coverage will be:

Cloud Mobile Analytics and game theory Unified communications and video
Next Generation Government Internet of things Legacy optimization

Experience

The team that Constellation Research brings to the table are nothing short of magnificent. Each player in their own right can stand out amongst the crowd as a leader in their field with a decade or more of experience who are not afraid to make tough calls.

It’s the collection of individuals brands that are important to Constellation as people will instinctively ask for advice from those analysts they trust. The issue of ‘contributing analyst’ is something that plays heavily on my mind – does a customer that goes to Phil Fersht get Horses for Sources or Constellation? It seems that this is all worked out via ethics and integrity policy which sounds good but I’ll be interested to see how easy this will be for clients to navigate.

I look forward to seeing how this group of analysts will push the edges on the research agenda.

Research

Ray left Altimeter on good terms and cited the main reason for his departure was a drive to focus on syndicated research. In an environment where I have traditionally seen more focus lean towards free research, it is interesting to see a firm who are going back to the traditional focus on paid content.

Constellation states that they will engage via open and syndicated research models:

image

The planned coverage areas are:

  • Big data and semantic web
  • Clean tech
  • Cloud security
  • Digital marketing transformation
  • Mobile development
  • Strategic HCM
  • Industry verticals
  • BFSI
  • Energy
  • Retail
  • Technology
  • Interactive ad networks

No doubt more areas will follow as disruptive influences take their course but at least for now their agenda seems smart.

Opinion

Without doubt, Ray’s departure from the superstar analyst firm to setup one that focuses on syndicated research brings its own disruptive forces to an increasingly shrinking analyst market. Fundamentally a research house, Constellation has brought together leaders in the field who like to write and advise buyers.

This firm will not be include bright young graduates, box counters or be a replica of the Enterprise Irregulars. Instead it sets out to be what made Giga, all those years ago, a unique and special firm.

Good look to Constellation Research.

More information: Blog, Twitter, Web Site

Original post

image

Within the analyst world the past year has been a dichotomy in the land of blogging. Whereas we have seen a surge in the number of analysts that have taken to this medium, it is contrasted with a decrease from the recognised ‘leaders’ in the frequency of which they post.

This new ranking system has fundamentally evolved since the last version to take into account the seismic shifts in the way people communicate online. The key changes relate to inbound links such as from Twitter as well as well as a combined Yahoo  / Google (3-month date limited) approach.

Whenever these lists are published, there are several points that always get raised which I will address now…

  1. This blog is not from an analyst. The argument as to whom is an analyst or a consultant is becoming largely moot. In my opinion if someone is independent and directly influences technology procurement then they are an analyst. I know this will cause a huge amount of disagreement but as an outsider looking in this is the way I see the market. This is not to say that some analysts have different strengths over others, it is more a case that I think as an AR pro, I need to monitor the lot of you.
  2. The blog is written by multiple authors. Some blogs have several analysts writing them whereas others do not. The merits of a single blog author is something that I personally favour as this allows me to understand the tone of blog without having to understand the many personalities that are associated with it. Regardless, for this table, my view has not been to argue this but merely to present the data.
  3. It is irrelevant showing all the blogs as I am only interested in a specific topic – bingo, that is exactly right. My suggestion to all AR pros is to identify which of your analysts are on this and only look at those. This list compiled from the newly updated analyst blog directory on Tekrati does not see to micro-segment but merely to list all blogs regardless of their speciality.
  4. Hey – you have forgotten to include this blog. Please let me know the name and if I will include it as an edit.
  5. Isn’t this just like TweetLevel but for blogs? Yep, this algorthim is part of a larger project to fully understand infleunce and engagement on the web. This methodology is part of BlogLevel.
  6. Will you be producing a league table for those on Twitter? Yes, next week.

Without further ado, congrats to everyone who is included and especially those who have managed to make the top 50 – this is an outstanding achievement. Of course, a huge pat on the back to ex-Forrester and now Altimeter analyst, Jeremiah Owyang for showing everyone how to combine blogs and twitter to tremendous effect.

Rank Blog Name image image image image image image
1 Web Strategy by Jeremiah 14.4 5.7 12.0 24.0 27.5 83.6
2 Compete Blog 14.4 4.8 9.3 19.4 14.7 62.7
3 Workplace Learning Today 12.0 4.1 7.5 14.0 24.9 62.4
4 James Governor’s MonkChips 14.4 5.1 7.7 17.5 13.8 58.4
5 Virtually Speaking 16.8 4.4 6.6 8.7 21.7 58.3
6 Service-Oriented Architecture 16.8 4.8 8.7 14.2 13.7 58.2
7 StorageMojo 12.0 5.2 8.7 14.0 17.2 57.1
8 Storage Bits 16.8 4.4 9.6 0.0 26.4 57.1
9 Greenmonk Associates 14.4 4.5 6.9 13.1 16.7 55.6
10 Customer Experience Matters 12.0 4.5 8.0 17.5 13.4 55.3
11 People Over Process 14.4 4.6 7.3 16.4 11.4 54.1
12 Chilmark Research 12.0 4.1 7.7 14.4 15.9 54.1
13 Collaborative Thinking 14.4 4.7 7.5 14.1 13.3 53.9
14 Column 2 by Sandy Kemsley 12.0 4.4 9.1 12.4 15.4 53.3
15 DBMS2 – DataBase Management System Services 12.0 4.3 7.2 15.3 14.5 53.2
16 Dean Bubley’s Disruptive Wireless 12.0 4.3 6.5 15.8 13.8 52.4
17 A Software Insider’s Point of View 12.0 4.3 8.0 15.1 13.0 52.3
18 CMS Watch Trends and Features 14.4 3.4 3.2 20.0 10.4 51.4
19 James Bach’s Blog 9.6 4.5 7.7 17.4 11.1 50.2
20 Hitwise Intelligence 14.4 4.9 0.0 16.4 14.5 50.1
21 Deal Architect 12.0 3.9 10.2 11.8 12.2 50.0
22 GoMo News 12.0 4.8 10.3 11.1 11.3 49.5
23 IDC eXchange 14.4 3.8 5.5 14.7 11.0 49.4
24 Message 12.0 4.4 9.6 16.3 6.4 48.7
25 Identity and Privacy Strategies Blog 12.0 3.9 7.7 12.4 12.5 48.5
26 Outside Innovation 12.0 4.4 1.6 19.5 11.0 48.5
27 Forrester’s Interactive Marketing Blog 12.0 4.8 10.4 16.4 4.7 48.2
28 451 CAOS Theory 14.4 4.6 9.7 14.0 5.3 47.8
29 Gartner – Jim Sinur 12.0 3.2 5.0 11.8 15.8 47.8
30 Music Industry Blog 12.0 3.2 4.5 12.7 15.1 47.5
31 Enterprise 2.0 Blog 14.4 5.9 8.4 13.6 5.2 47.4
32 Brandon Hall Analyst Blog – Janet Clarey 12.0 4.7 5.0 14.2 11.3 47.2
33 Local Onliner 12.0 4.6 5.7 12.8 11.9 47.0
34 Securosis Blog 12.0 3.6 9.5 14.2 7.7 46.9
35 Forrester Blog For Information andKM Professionals 12.0 4.7 6.8 13.4 9.4 46.2
36 Forrester Blog for Consumer Product Strategy Professionals 12.0 3.6 9.5 10.8 10.3 46.2
37 Gartner – John Pescatore 12.0 3.4 6.6 11.8 12.3 46.1
38 Business Process and Applications Commentary 12.0 3.8 7.8 11.1 11.2 45.9
39 Local Media Blog 12.0 4.4 8.0 14.4 6.8 45.7
40 Always On Real-Time Access 9.6 4.4 6.4 14.7 10.5 45.5
41 Enterprise Anti-Matter 12.0 3.9 4.8 12.4 12.3 45.4
42 George F. Colony’s Blog: Counterintuitive 12.0 4.0 5.9 13.0 10.4 45.3
43 Vendorprisey 12.0 4.7 4.5 16.4 7.7 45.2
44 VideoNuze 12.0 4.3 8.2 13.2 7.4 45.0
45 Forrester Product Management Blog 12.0 4.1 6.1 13.4 9.5 45.0
46 Collaboration and Content Strategies Blog 12.0 2.7 7.4 12.0 10.6 44.7
47 Gartner – Allen Weiner 12.0 3.0 5.3 10.4 13.7 44.4
48 ThreatChaos 9.6 4.1 6.1 13.4 11.2 44.3
49 isen.blog 14.4 5.0 5.7 7.8 11.1 44.0
50 Market Strategies for IT Suppliers 9.6 3.9 4.8 9.1 16.5 43.8
51 Application Platform Strategies Blog 12.0 0.0 7.3 13.1 11.4 43.8
52 Gartner – Andrea Di Maio 12.0 3.0 9.3 11.4 7.4 43.2
53 Bryan Chapman 12.0 3.8 3.2 10.9 12.8 42.7
54 Data Center Strategies Blog 12.0 3.0 5.9 12.3 9.4 42.5
55 Gartner – Nick Jones 12.0 3.7 5.3 10.6 10.9 42.4
56 Contentblogger 14.4 4.0 4.8 12.7 6.5 42.3
57 Contentblogger(TM) – News Commentary 14.4 4.0 4.8 12.7 6.5 42.3
58 ThinkBalm – Immersive Internet Insights and Expertise 12.0 3.4 6.9 4.3 15.5 41.9
59 Gartner – Jeffrey Mann 12.0 2.3 0.0 9.9 17.4 41.5
60 tecosystems 14.4 4.2 0.0 17.0 5.8 41.4
61 Text Technologies 12.0 4.1 2.5 13.6 9.3 41.4
62 Yankee Group Blog 12.0 3.8 5.7 12.9 7.0 41.4
63 Gartner – Kristin Moyer 12.0 3.1 3.2 10.1 13.0 41.3
64 IT Infrastructure and Operations 12.0 4.0 4.8 11.3 9.1 41.2
65 Web Globalization Blog 12.0 3.9 3.2 11.3 10.6 40.9
66 New Communications Review 12.0 4.1 2.5 11.8 10.5 40.8
67 Forrester – The Future Of Agencies Blog 12.0 3.7 4.5 11.4 9.2 40.8
68 Cutter Blog 12.0 3.5 4.8 15.9 4.6 40.7
69 Gartner – Tom Bittman 12.0 3.7 6.6 13.0 5.5 40.7
70 Local Mobile Search 7.2 3.2 8.5 12.8 9.0 40.6
71 Gartner – Jim Holincheck 12.0 2.2 2.5 9.6 13.9 40.2
72 Deborah Schultz 12.0 4.0 3.7 12.4 8.0 40.1
73 Supply Chain Matters 9.6 4.3 3.2 10.5 12.4 40.0
74 BlogERP – Jim Holincheck’s HCM Software Blog 12.0 3.1 2.5 11.6 10.7 39.9
75 Gilbane Group Blog 14.4 4.2 1.6 11.8 7.8 39.8
76 Groundswell 0.0 5.1 0.0 17.0 17.7 39.8
77 Brandon Hall Analyst Blog – Gary Woodill 12.0 2.8 2.5 10.5 11.9 39.7
78 Forrester Blog for Customer Intelligence Professionals 0.0 2.5 3.2 17.9 16.1 39.7
79 Greg’s Storage IO Blog 9.6 3.3 3.2 11.0 12.5 39.6
80 Global Watchtower 12.0 3.9 5.9 12.6 5.1 39.5
81 Gartner – Neil MacDonald 12.0 2.9 5.0 10.3 9.2 39.4
82 Gartner – Thomas Otter 12.0 3.1 2.5 10.5 11.0 39.1
83 VisionMobile blog 12.0 3.8 6.1 12.5 4.7 39.1
84 Analytics Evolution 9.6 3.3 1.6 10.0 14.6 39.1
85 Gartner – Ray Valdes 12.0 2.0 0.0 9.9 15.1 39.0
86 HDTV Almanac 9.6 6.0 10.5 6.9 6.0 39.0
87 Gartner – Mark McDonald 12.0 2.4 4.1 9.5 10.9 38.9
88 The Enterprise System Spectator 12.0 4.5 4.5 12.2 5.5 38.8
89 BuddeBlog 12.0 3.6 2.5 8.9 11.6 38.6
90 Gartner – Greg Young 12.0 2.6 3.2 11.2 9.4 38.4
91 Gartner – Kathy Harris 12.0 2.2 1.6 9.7 12.9 38.4
92 Travel Technology 9.6 4.0 0.0 13.0 11.7 38.2
93 IT Blog Watch 14.4 5.0 0.0 12.4 6.1 37.9
94 Gartner Blog by Mike McGuire 12.0 2.1 1.6 9.2 12.9 37.8
95 The Future of Enterprise Software 12.0 4.1 3.2 9.5 8.9 37.6
96 View from Forrester 16.8 3.8 5.0 7.1 4.8 37.5
97 BriefingsDirect Transcripts 12.0 3.9 8.7 8.1 4.9 37.5
98 Gartner – French Caldwell 12.0 1.9 2.5 8.8 12.2 37.4
99 451 Take on information management, Too much information 14.4 3.4 1.6 13.1 4.9 37.3
100 Javelin Strategy and Research 14.4 3.6 0.0 13.6 5.7 37.3
101 Forrester: Application Dev & Prog Man. Profs 12.0 3.7 4.8 9.7 7.2 37.3
102 Judith Hurwitz’ Weblog 9.6 3.5 0.0 12.5 11.6 37.2
103 Gartner – Mark Driver 12.0 2.1 0.0 10.0 12.9 37.0
104 Gartner – Lydia Leong 12.0 3.3 3.2 10.7 7.6 36.8
105 Teblog 9.6 4.2 0.0 9.9 13.2 36.8
106 Gartner – Anthony Bradley 12.0 2.5 4.1 11.2 6.8 36.6
107 Opus Research 9.6 2.1 4.5 7.5 13.0 36.6
108 NPD Group Blog 14.4 3.7 4.1 10.4 4.1 36.6
109 Security and Risk Management Strategies Blog 12.0 0.0 3.7 11.2 9.7 36.5
110 The Guidewire 12.0 3.5 1.6 10.3 9.0 36.4
111 Kelsey Group Blogs 12.0 0.0 1.6 14.3 8.5 36.4
112 Spire Security Viewpoint 12.0 3.5 2.5 14.3 4.0 36.3
113 The Brampton Factor 14.4 1.0 0.0 18.2 2.8 36.3
114 Tech – Surf – Blog 9.6 3.8 6.2 10.6 6.0 36.2
115 The Hot Aisle 9.6 4.6 2.5 11.0 8.5 36.2
116 Gartner – Whit Andrews 12.0 3.2 1.6 10.2 9.2 36.1
117 The Outsourcing Blog Horses for Sources 14.4 5.0 0.0 11.5 5.3 36.0
118 Peter O’Kelly’s Reality Check 12.0 4.5 0.0 11.4 8.1 36.0
119 Gartner – Jim Lundy 12.0 1.9 0.0 8.8 13.3 36.0
120 Altimeter Group 0.0 3.0 6.9 13.7 12.3 35.9
121 Gartner – Tom Austin 12.0 1.8 2.5 9.4 10.1 35.8
122 Gartner – Mark Raskino 12.0 1.9 0.0 9.1 12.6 35.6
123 Forrester Blog For Enterprise Architecture Professionals 12.0 2.8 2.5 10.0 8.3 35.5
124 Gartner – Jeff Roster 12.0 2.1 0.0 9.2 12.2 35.4
125 Out of the Box 7.2 4.0 0.0 9.6 14.6 35.4
126 DisplaySearch Blog 12.0 3.7 3.7 11.2 4.6 35.2
127 THINK IT Services 12.0 3.8 3.7 9.7 5.9 35.0
128 kirkk.com 7.2 2.9 7.3 13.3 4.1 34.8
129 Parks Associates 12.0 4.0 0.0 12.6 6.3 34.8
130 Pattern Finder 9.6 3.8 1.6 10.4 9.4 34.8
131 Health Content Advisors 9.6 2.4 5.3 8.5 8.7 34.4
132 Gartner – Andrew White 12.0 1.8 1.6 10.5 8.5 34.4
133 Forrester: eBusiness & Channel Strategy Pros 12.0 3.2 4.8 9.8 4.5 34.3
134 Ron Shevlin’s Marketing Whims 12.0 4.5 0.0 15.1 2.6 34.2
135 Gartner – Brian Prentice 12.0 2.4 6.1 9.7 4.0 34.1
136 The Pervasive Datacenter 14.4 2.5 0.0 10.5 6.6 34.0
137 Gartner – Michael Maoz 12.0 4.2 1.6 0.0 16.0 33.8
138 Gil Yehuda’s Enterprise 2.0 Blog 7.2 4.1 6.4 3.3 12.9 33.8
139 Z Trek – The Alan Zeichick Weblog 9.6 3.9 3.7 10.9 5.7 33.8
140 The TEC Blog 9.6 3.5 3.7 10.9 6.1 33.8
141 Enterprise Search Blog 14.4 4.0 0.0 10.6 4.7 33.8
142 Gartner – Nick Gall 12.0 2.4 0.0 10.6 8.7 33.7
143 Jon Arnold’s Blog 12.0 4.7 3.7 7.4 5.9 33.6
144 All Aboard 12.0 2.8 0.0 12.2 6.6 33.6
145 Business Continuity – Pandemic Threat 14.4 4.1 1.6 7.9 5.6 33.5
146 James Kobielus’ Blog 12.0 3.6 5.0 8.2 4.3 33.2
147 Enterprise Mobility Matters 9.6 3.8 5.7 9.0 4.7 32.9
148 Security and Risk Management 12.0 4.0 0.0 11.3 5.5 32.8
149 Gartner – Frank Kenney 12.0 2.9 0.0 10.4 7.5 32.7
150 Analyst Xpress 12.0 2.5 3.2 10.8 4.3 32.7
151 Michael Fauscette 9.6 3.5 2.5 7.1 10.0 32.7
152 Laurie McCabe’s Blog 9.6 3.2 2.5 6.7 10.5 32.6
153 Plausible Deniability 12.0 3.3 2.5 11.4 3.4 32.6
154 Supernova Hub 12.0 4.3 7.1 3.8 5.3 32.5
155 Osterman Research Blog 9.6 3.9 0.0 10.0 8.8 32.4
156 Richi Blog 7.2 4.0 0.0 12.2 8.9 32.2
157 Executive Advisory Blog 12.0 2.6 2.5 8.0 6.8 32.0
158 Corporate Integrity, LLC 12.0 3.6 3.2 9.7 3.3 31.8
159 The Real Truth about Technology and IT 9.6 2.3 4.1 9.0 6.6 31.6
160 Ceci N’est Pas Un Bob 12.0 4.0 2.5 11.1 1.8 31.4
161 IDEAS Insights 9.6 2.9 5.0 8.8 4.8 31.1
162 Gartner – Andrew Frank 12.0 2.8 2.5 10.6 3.1 31.1
163 KnowledgeForward 7.2 2.9 4.8 11.1 5.1 31.0
164 Karen Hobert’s Connecting Dots 12.0 3.8 3.7 7.6 3.9 30.9
165 Forrester: Sourcing and Vendor Management Pros 12.0 3.5 0.0 8.2 7.2 30.9
166 Werblog 14.4 4.8 0.0 11.6 0.0 30.8
167 Gartner – Daryl Plummer 12.0 3.7 0.0 12.6 2.5 30.8
168 XML Technologies and Content Strategies 12.0 2.6 3.2 10.5 2.4 30.7
169 Gartner – David M. Smith 12.0 2.1 0.0 8.3 8.1 30.6
170 Gartner – Cameron Haight 12.0 2.8 0.0 9.9 5.9 30.6
171 Supply Chain Reaction 12.0 3.8 2.5 6.4 5.8 30.5
172 Brandon Hall Analyst Blog – Richard Nantel 12.0 3.8 0.0 11.1 3.6 30.5
173 Forrester Blog for IT Leaders in Asia Pacific 12.0 2.5 0.0 8.2 7.5 30.2
174 Attic Dust 12.0 0.0 4.8 3.8 9.6 30.2
175 Robin Bloor’s Blog: have Mac will blog 9.6 3.2 0.0 10.5 6.8 30.0
176 Gartner – Debbie Wilson 12.0 3.8 0.0 10.0 4.2 30.0
177 Irwin Lazar’s Real-time Blog 12.0 4.3 1.6 7.7 4.2 29.9
178 Gartner – Scott Nelson 12.0 2.0 0.0 3.8 11.8 29.7
179 Ferris Research 9.6 3.4 0.0 9.5 7.1 29.5
180 Richard Nantel 12.0 3.8 0.0 11.1 2.6 29.5
181 BriefingsDirect 12.0 4.1 8.4 0.0 4.7 29.2
182 Click 12.0 3.1 3.2 10.0 1.0 29.2
183 Consider the Source 12.0 3.5 1.6 7.4 4.8 29.2
184 Globalization Blog 12.0 3.7 0.0 9.1 4.4 29.2
185 Unified-View 12.0 4.3 0.0 8.7 3.8 28.7
186 Brandon Hall Analyst Blog – Tom Werner 12.0 2.8 0.0 7.9 6.0 28.6
187 Unified Communications Strategies 12.0 3.2 0.0 9.2 4.1 28.4
188 RedMonk Radio Podcast 12.0 2.6 0.0 8.7 5.1 28.4
189 INPUT Blog 9.6 1.8 0.0 9.1 7.9 28.3
190 Forrester Blog For CIOs 12.0 2.7 0.0 10.2 3.3 28.1
191 Blog Mike Ferguson 9.6 4.2 4.1 3.3 6.9 28.0
192 Network and Telecom Strategies Blog 12.0 2.0 0.0 8.4 5.5 27.9
193 Forrester Blog For Consumer Market Research Professionals 0.0 2.5 5.7 8.2 11.4 27.9
194 Fuld’s Competitive Musings 12.0 3.0 1.6 9.5 1.8 27.8
195 Amy Wohl’s Opinions 9.6 3.8 0.0 10.7 3.6 27.7
196 The Monash Report 12.0 3.8 0.0 9.4 2.4 27.6
197 Nucleus Research 14.4 2.3 0.0 7.5 3.4 27.6
198 Fern Halper’s data makes the world go round 9.6 3.2 1.6 10.2 2.9 27.5
199 Gartner – David McCoy 12.0 2.3 0.0 10.0 3.3 27.5
200 Gartner – Wes Rishel 12.0 2.4 0.0 9.5 3.5 27.4
201 Amy Wohl’s Opinions on SaaS 12.0 3.8 0.0 0.0 11.5 27.3
202 Celent Banking Blog 9.6 2.3 0.0 10.5 4.7 27.1
203 E-Communications and Community 12.0 3.7 0.0 8.1 3.3 27.1
204 Binstock on Software 12.0 0.0 0.0 13.0 2.0 27.0
205 CCS Insight Blog 7.2 2.6 0.0 10.1 7.0 26.9
206 Lux Populi 12.0 1.2 0.0 8.4 5.3 26.9
207 Thinking Global 12.0 3.4 0.0 7.2 4.1 26.7
208 Forrester Research – Customer Experience in Japan 12.0 3.3 0.0 9.9 1.4 26.6
209 Ironick 9.6 3.6 0.0 9.3 3.9 26.4
210 Lower (Carbon) Footprint 0.0 2.8 0.0 22.2 1.4 26.3
211 Gartner – Dan Sholler 12.0 2.0 0.0 6.4 5.8 26.1
212 elemental links 7.2 3.8 2.5 9.1 3.5 26.1
213 First Thing Monday 12.0 3.5 0.0 9.5 0.8 25.7
214 Gartner – Toby Bell 12.0 2.0 0.0 9.4 2.2 25.6
215 Data Management Strategies 12.0 2.6 0.0 6.7 4.1 25.4
216 Strategic Messaging 12.0 3.7 0.0 7.7 1.9 25.4
217 The Geo Factor 12.0 3.7 0.0 9.7 0.0 25.3
218 Gartner – Gene Alvarez 12.0 1.7 0.0 8.9 2.7 25.3
219 TelcoTV-View 9.6 2.4 0.0 11.2 2.0 25.3
220 Gartner – Adam Hils 12.0 1.8 0.0 6.4 5.0 25.2
221 Adam’s Heart Valve Surgery Blog 7.2 3.7 4.5 2.6 7.0 25.0
222 Gartner – Eric Goodness 12.0 1.7 0.0 9.6 1.7 24.9
223 Gilbane Events Blog 12.0 2.3 0.0 6.4 4.2 24.9
224 Home Theater View 7.2 3.6 10.5 0.0 3.7 24.9
225 eurotechnology.japan.blog 9.6 3.8 0.0 9.4 2.2 24.9
226 Software Memories 12.0 3.7 0.0 7.4 1.7 24.7
227 Mostly Enterprise Architecture 7.2 2.4 0.0 4.9 10.1 24.7
228 Connections 9.6 3.8 0.0 6.7 4.5 24.6
229 IT Depends 9.6 3.5 0.0 3.3 8.1 24.6
230 Gartner – Brian Gammage 12.0 1.7 1.6 4.6 4.6 24.5
231 Gartner – Dave Cappuccio 12.0 2.6 0.0 7.0 2.8 24.5
232 Insecure about Security 9.6 3.8 0.0 7.1 3.9 24.4
233 comScore Voices 16.8 3.8 0.0 0.0 3.9 24.4
234 doingITbetter 9.6 4.0 0.0 8.8 2.0 24.4
235 Gartner – Roberta Witty 12.0 2.0 0.0 6.4 3.8 24.2
236 MacehiterWard-Dutton 9.6 4.1 1.6 3.8 4.9 24.0
237 Celent Insurance Blog 9.6 3.2 0.0 7.6 3.7 24.0
238 Freeform Comment 9.6 3.5 0.0 8.4 2.5 23.9
239 Content Nation 9.6 2.2 0.0 7.7 4.3 23.8
240 The InfoCommerce Blog 9.6 3.8 0.0 7.2 3.1 23.7
241 NanoMarkets TOP Blog 9.6 3.6 0.0 9.3 1.2 23.6
242 fasol.blog 9.6 2.9 0.0 9.1 1.9 23.4
243 Gartner – David Norton 12.0 1.7 0.0 6.6 2.8 23.1
244 Gartner – Eric Knipp 12.0 2.0 0.0 5.7 3.3 23.0
245 Gartner – Debra Logan 12.0 2.1 0.0 7.5 1.3 22.8
246 Tom Raftery’s Social Media 9.6 2.7 0.0 0.0 10.5 22.8
247 Gartner – Richard Fouts 12.0 1.8 0.0 5.7 3.2 22.7
248 Cote’s Weblog 12.0 3.2 0.0 1.6 5.9 22.7
249 billtrippe 12.0 0.0 0.0 6.4 4.2 22.6
250 The Bourne Report 9.6 3.0 0.0 7.7 2.1 22.4
251 Gartner – Bruce Robertson 12.0 1.6 1.6 4.6 2.5 22.3
252 Gartner – Benoit Lheureux 12.0 1.6 0.0 5.5 3.2 22.3
253 NewMediaWise 9.6 3.4 0.0 9.2 0.0 22.1
254 Leadership Drives Business 0.0 2.9 0.0 12.2 7.0 22.1
255 IT BULLETins 12.0 3.9 0.0 4.6 1.5 22.0
256 Beagle Research 12.0 0.0 0.0 9.9 0.0 21.9
257 The Business of Talent 0.0 2.9 0.0 12.2 6.8 21.9
258 Berlecon Analyst Weblog 12.0 0.0 0.0 7.2 2.7 21.9
259 IT Services and Outsourcing 12.0 2.5 0.0 7.4 0.0 21.8
260 Gartner – Carol Rozwell 12.0 1.6 0.0 5.2 3.0 21.8
261 TeleGeography News and Analysis 14.4 2.6 0.0 2.6 2.0 21.7
262 Andy on Enterprise Software 9.6 2.7 0.0 6.7 2.6 21.6
263 Pike Research Blog 9.6 1.6 0.0 4.9 5.3 21.5
264 Localization Industry 411 7.2 3.4 0.0 10.0 0.9 21.5
265 Optimal Friction 7.2 3.2 0.0 7.1 3.4 20.9
266 Gartner – Donna Fitzgerald 12.0 1.9 0.0 3.8 3.2 20.8
267 Gartner – Michael Blechar 12.0 1.8 0.0 5.5 1.4 20.7
268 Blogging at Zinnov 4.8 0.5 0.0 7.0 8.4 20.7
269 Liquefying IT 12.0 3.8 0.0 0.0 4.9 20.7
270 iLocus 7.2 3.2 0.0 8.3 1.7 20.5
271 Gartner Voice 14.4 2.4 0.0 0.0 3.5 20.3
272 Contentblogger(TM) – Industry Events 9.6 1.9 0.0 7.7 0.9 20.1
273 Got Tannins? 9.6 4.1 0.0 4.9 1.5 20.0
274 Thinking Out Loud 12.0 2.5 0.0 0.0 5.5 19.9
275 Gartner – Phillip Redman 12.0 1.8 0.0 3.3 2.7 19.8
276 Chipworks Blog 9.6 2.9 1.6 0.0 5.6 19.7
277 Security Architect 9.6 2.7 0.0 4.6 2.7 19.6
278 what’s next? 9.6 2.8 0.0 4.6 2.5 19.5
279 Gartner – Van Baker 12.0 1.7 0.0 3.3 2.5 19.4
280 Thus Prate the IT Pundit 7.2 3.2 0.0 6.4 2.6 19.4
281 Open Reasoning 9.6 2.3 0.0 4.9 2.5 19.3
282 Technology Marketing Blog 7.2 3.0 0.0 6.1 3.0 19.3
283 Forrester Blog for Technology Sales Enablement Professionals 0.0 2.1 3.2 5.7 8.3 19.3
284 John Katsaros 7.2 0.7 0.0 6.7 4.5 19.2
285 Joel Orr’s World 7.2 0.7 0.0 6.7 4.5 19.2
286 Techaisle 7.2 1.9 2.5 4.3 3.2 19.1
287 The Bigger Truth 0.0 2.2 0.0 11.2 5.5 18.9
288 Gartner – Rob DeSisto 12.0 1.6 0.0 1.6 3.6 18.8
289 The Future of Publishing 9.6 3.2 2.5 0.0 3.5 18.8
290 Gartner – Brian Burke 12.0 1.7 0.0 3.8 1.2 18.7
291 Total Immersion 7.2 2.8 0.0 7.7 0.9 18.6
292 Mark My Words 9.6 3.5 0.0 0.0 5.4 18.5
293 No Jitter Weblog – Melanie Turek 12.0 1.9 0.0 0.0 4.6 18.5
294 No Jitter Weblog – Michael Finneran 12.0 1.8 0.0 0.0 4.6 18.4
295 Global Trends and Benchmarks 0.0 1.0 0.0 12.2 5.3 18.4
296 No Jitter Weblog – Irwin Lazar 12.0 1.4 0.0 0.0 4.8 18.2
297 No Jitter Weblog – Zeus Kerravala 12.0 2.6 0.0 0.0 3.5 18.1
298 Identerati 9.6 2.4 0.0 6.1 0.0 18.0
299 The Technology Garden 7.2 2.2 0.0 8.6 0.0 17.9
300 Steve’s IT Rants 4.8 0.6 0.0 12.5 0.0 17.9
301 Geosophical technologies 7.2 2.6 0.0 6.4 1.7 17.9
302 Heavy Lifting Analyst Notes 12.0 1.8 0.0 0.0 4.0 17.8
303 Jon Peddie Blogs 9.6 1.1 0.0 3.8 3.2 17.7
304 JPR Staff Blogs 9.6 1.1 0.0 3.8 3.2 17.7
305 No Jitter Weblog – Sheila McGee-Smith 12.0 1.2 0.0 0.0 4.5 17.6
306 Burton Group Inflection Point 7.2 3.5 0.0 4.3 2.6 17.6
307 Craig Mathias’s Blog 0.0 3.6 0.0 9.1 4.9 17.6
308 ABI Research Analyst Blogs 12.0 1.7 0.0 0.0 3.8 17.5
309 Learning on the Leading Edge 0.0 0.0 0.0 12.2 5.3 17.5
310 Mobile Insight and Search 7.2 3.3 0.0 6.6 0.0 17.1
311 No Jitter Weblog – Tom Nolle 12.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 4.1 17.0
312 Gene Phifer’s Personal Blog 7.2 1.2 0.0 8.7 0.0 17.0
313 Nothing to Declare 4.8 3.5 0.0 6.4 2.2 16.9
314 bit blue blog 7.2 3.3 0.0 6.4 0.0 16.9
315 Gartner – Frank Ridder 12.0 1.6 0.0 0.0 3.3 16.9
316 No Jitter Weblog – Brian Riggs 12.0 1.1 0.0 0.0 3.6 16.6
317 Keeping IT Grounded 9.6 1.7 0.0 5.2 0.0 16.5
318 Connecting the Dots 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.8 8.5 16.3
319 BPMS Watch 12.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.3 16.3
320 Communication Innovations 12.0 3.2 0.0 0.0 0.9 16.1
321 Gap Intelligence 4.8 2.7 0.0 0.0 8.6 16.1
322 Peter Christy 7.2 1.8 0.0 4.6 2.4 16.0
323 Jen McClure’s Ruminations 9.6 1.3 0.0 4.3 0.8 16.0
324 Gartner – Tole Hart 12.0 1.8 0.0 0.0 2.2 16.0
325 Gartner – Martin Reynolds 12.0 1.7 0.0 0.0 2.0 15.7
326 Gartner – Earl Perkins 0.0 1.9 1.6 8.0 3.8 15.3
327 Gilbane Publishing Technology Blog 14.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.8 15.2
328 The Analyst View 9.6 2.0 0.0 0.0 3.6 15.1
329 Shosteck Group Insights 9.6 1.0 0.0 3.3 1.0 14.9
330 Technology Pundits – Rob Enderle 9.6 3.3 0.0 0.0 1.9 14.7
331 Gartner – Donald Feinberg 9.6 1.6 0.0 0.0 3.5 14.7
332 The Saltworks 7.2 1.5 0.0 3.3 2.2 14.2
333 Compass Intelligence 7.2 3.5 0.0 0.0 3.3 13.9
334 Wicked Flavory 4.8 2.2 0.0 6.9 0.0 13.9
335 Marcia Kaufman’s Weblog 9.6 1.1 0.0 3.3 -0.2 13.7
336 On Target Embedded Systems 7.2 3.1 0.0 0.0 3.4 13.7
337 Rabkin’s ROI 0.0 1.5 0.0 3.8 8.3 13.6
338 Forrester Blog for B2B Market Research Professionals 0.0 2.3 0.0 5.2 6.0 13.5
339 Foro Empresarial 0.0 2.6 0.0 5.9 4.9 13.4
340 joygantic 4.8 2.3 0.0 5.5 0.8 13.4
341 Andreas Antonopoulos’s blog 9.6 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 13.3
342 WirelessView 7.2 1.1 0.0 4.9 0.0 13.2
343 IMHO 0.0 0.5 0.0 8.9 3.7 13.1
344 GigaOM Pro Blog 0.0 0.3 0.0 5.9 6.9 13.1
345 Innovating Government 0.0 3.2 0.0 8.7 1.1 13.0
346 Commvine 2.4 1.2 0.0 6.4 2.9 12.9
347 On Taget: Embedded Systems 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.6 5.3 12.9
348 TV Strategies 4.8 2.8 0.0 5.2 0.0 12.8
349 Burton Group Weblog 9.6 3.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 12.7
350 The Collaboration Blog 7.2 3.1 0.0 0.0 2.4 12.7
351 Chip Hatchery 7.2 1.1 0.0 0.0 4.4 12.6
352 Technology Pundits – Richard Doherty 7.2 3.3 0.0 0.0 2.0 12.5
353 iGR Weekly Blog 0.0 1.6 0.0 9.5 1.3 12.4
354 The Naked Chief Blog 7.2 0.5 0.0 1.6 3.0 12.3
355 The Innovation Zone 9.6 1.1 0.0 0.0 1.4 12.1
356 Cannell.org 0.0 3.4 0.0 4.6 3.9 12.0
357 Technology Pundits – Tim Bajarin 7.2 3.3 0.0 0.0 1.5 12.0
358 Open Source Unleashed – All Bets Off 9.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.3 11.9
359 MavBlog 7.2 0.6 0.0 1.6 2.0 11.5
360 Ted Ritter’s blog 9.6 0.3 0.0 0.0 1.6 11.5
361 Sageza Says 0.0 1.2 0.0 5.9 4.1 11.3
362 Digital Consumer 0.0 2.0 0.0 4.6 4.6 11.2
363 Strategy Analytisc – Digital Consumer 0.0 2.0 0.0 4.6 4.3 10.9
364 Enterprise Advocates 0.0 3.5 3.2 0.0 4.0 10.7
365 Jeff and Hennie’s Stuff 0.0 1.8 0.0 7.7 0.9 10.5
366 Retail PLM and Sourcing 4.8 0.0 0.0 1.6 4.1 10.5
367 Ben’s Tech Blog 0.0 0.0 0.0 6.1 4.3 10.4
368 NRG TechView research and analysis 7.2 1.6 0.0 0.0 1.5 10.3
369 Johna Till Johnson’s blog 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.9 5.3 10.3
370 Lopez Research Blog 7.2 1.2 0.0 0.0 1.8 10.2
371 John Burke’s blog 9.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 9.6
372 Digital Media Bulletin 0.0 2.6 0.0 5.7 1.1 9.4
373 A Springboard to Services 7.2 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.1 9.2
374 alvear.com 4.8 1.7 0.0 0.0 2.7 9.1
375 DVR Bulletin 7.2 1.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 9.0
376 Views from the Bridge 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.2 3.2 8.5
377 Collaboration service news 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 7.9 8.4
378 Amy’s Food Adventures 0.0 1.9 0.0 3.8 2.5 8.3
379 JapanStrategy-Blog 0.0 2.6 0.0 4.3 1.2 8.1
380 Carl Gressum’s blog 0.0 1.0 0.0 4.3 2.5 7.7
381 Government IT Infrastructure Blog 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.6 5.8 7.4
382 Product Value Management 4.8 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.6 7.3
383 Application Delivery 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.6 2.6 7.3
384 Gartner – Michael Hanford 0.0 1.4 0.0 2.6 2.9 7.0
385 MetaMurph’s Metasphere 4.8 0.5 0.0 0.0 1.3 6.5
386 Technology Pundits – Roger Kay 0.0 3.3 0.0 0.0 3.2 6.5
387 I of Innovation 0.0 1.7 0.0 3.8 0.6 6.2
388 Green IT Sourcing 4.8 1.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.9
389 Cloud Computing Blog 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.6 3.1 5.7
390 Annoying Design 4.8 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.3
391 Thoughts From a Software IT Analyst 0.0 0.9 0.0 1.6 2.5 5.1
392 Key Analysis Research and Consulting – Blog 0.0 0.5 0.0 3.3 1.2 5.0
393 HealthTech Industry Perspectives 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.9 4.9
394 Internet2Go – An Opus RAS 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.6 4.6
395 JBB Research Blog 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.6 4.6
396 Software Delivery news 0.0 0.8 0.0 0.0 3.8 4.6
397 The Changing Life Sciences Value Chain Blog 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.5 4.5
398 Executive Blog 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.5 4.5
399 Health Plan Business and Technology Views 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.0 3.8 4.2
400 Big Picture 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.8 3.8

Methodology

I have taken the feedback I have received from the previous research and modified the methodology.

Scores are now calculated as follows:

Google PageRankGoogle PageRank is a link analysis algorithm that interprets web links and assigns a numerical weighting (0 to 10) to each site. High-quality sites receive a higher PageRank. The ranking uses the actual PageRank as part of its algorithm.

Yahoo Inbound Links [date unlimited]Yahoo counts the total number of inbound links that go directly to a blog. Each number was assigned to a range which was then used as part of the algorithm.

Google Inbound Links [3 months date limited]Google allows people to search the number of inbound links to a specific blog but limit this to a predefined date period. Similar to how Technorati only looks at six months of data, this method was used in combination with the Yahoo Inbound Link count to assess which blogs were considered to be important due to the number of links that came to them, but also currently relevant as measured by the limitations on the timescale. Each number was assigned to a range which was then used as part of the algorithm.

Google Reader SubscribersGoogle reader lists the total number of subscribers to a blog. I believe this is a more realistic number to that which Bloglines provides. Mihai Parparita confirms that “these numbers include subscribers across all Google services”. To account for people using other readers (e.g. Newsgator) it has been suggested that this number is multiplied by 3. Subscriber ranges were determined (i.e. more than 20, more than 30, etc.) and each range was assigned a number that was used as part of the algorithm.

Frequency of Posts – Updating relevant and interesting content frequently onto a blog will naturally cause more people to find this blog important. This score is established via Google Reader to understand the precise number of posts per week that the blogger makes. Frequency numbers were determined and assigned to a range that was used as part of the algorithm.

Date Last Blog Post Published – Working in combination with ‘Frequency of Posts’, this score mitigates against blogs that were once popular but haven’t been updated for a long time. The number of days since the last blog post was calculated and assigned to a range which was used as part of the algorithm.

Comments – A simple way to judge how valuable a blog is to other people is through the number of comments (where this is enabled) that visitors make. In a similar way to linking and subscribing this user requested service shows a significant value. The number of comments made over the last five posts were calculated and assigned to a range which was used as part of the algorithm.

Twitter Inbound Links – There are various online tools available to count the number of links inbound to a blog from Twitter. Backtype was used to count the number of these occurrences over the past five blog posts. The number of times this happened was calculated and assigned a range which was used as part of the algorithm.

Weighting – Each specific variable listed above was given a standard score out of 10. Using a weighting scale I varied the importance of the each metric to establish a blogs total score.

Badges

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by: @jonnybentwood

Orignially posted on Technobabble 2.0

In a year where analysts have had to prove their worth to fight back against the reduction in discretionary spend, we would like to applaud those companies and individuals who have shown a commitment to providing a service that goes above and beyond what is expected.

This series of blog posts will showcase the results of the recent ‘Analyst of the Year Survey’. The results of this survey were collated over a three month period during which time 137 AR pros responded to a questionnaire available on surveymonkey.

In case you are wondering, the highest accolade of “Analyst of the Year” and “Analyst Firm of the Year” will be announced in the second post in this series.

Results (part 1)

Most Important Analyst House

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Most Important Analysts

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*NB. Not enough data was collected on “important consumer analysts” to make the results confident.

Opinion on Firm Importance

Note – this post refers to ‘importance’ NOT analyst of the year which will be covered in the next post.

When I compare the results from last year there seems to be a significant trend to the larger international houses. Gartner, Forrester and IDC seem to haul in the majority of opinions as to which firm is the most important.

Perhaps it is of little surprise that firms are cutting back and focusing on the analyst houses that have the greatest global reach. However, it is somewhat refreshing that other houses also are listed and have managed to carve out their own niches – notably: Verdantix and Quocirca in the green IT space and RedMonk and MWD in the developer/ IT Pro sector. It is in these smaller, areas where ‘boutique’ firms have managed to push their own USP and become sector leaders. Whether this was by choice or accident, I don’t mind but perhaps this is a new trend that we should monitor.

It is also worth giving a special mention to both AMR and Ovum who between them seemed to just miss out as they both made a high number of 4th places.

Opinion on Analyst Importance

There is a partial correlation between analyst house importance and analyst importance with a few significant exceptions. Most notably where people attach more importance on the individual rather than the company. This could be because of the bespoke value they give to firms and their unique intelligence and insight.

Notable analysts who fall into this category include David Mitchell from Ovum, Ray Wang from Forrester and James Governor from RedMonk.

David Mitchell, commenting on the results said:

Being recognized by your customers is always an honour, especially when the recognition comes from the IIAR and its members. Being recognized in enterprise, software, and services is especially gratifying.

European excellence

Even though the IIAR is based in  the UK, the fact that new chapters are opening up around the world is testament to the fact that this survey was truly global in its reach. At first analysis, I was immediately concerned over the relatively high number of awards that have gone to EMEA-based analysts and firms thinking that this was due to the physical location of the voters.

However, 72% of all respondents were based in the US or Canada.

As to why the Europeans tend to so well…

My personal view is that whereas a great deal of syndicated research tends to get created and published from the US, the European analysts have to rely on their revenue stream coming from their local market knowledge, deep messaging insights and customer focus. To put it bluntly, they need to prove value otherwise they will be out of a job. This point may well be the most contentious and I am happy to discuss this point further.

Given that there are NO US boutique analysts that appear in the “most important” list, perhaps the question that should be raised is “what gives European based analysts this reputation in the US but not vice versa?”

What factors make someone pick a firm or individual as important

Brand, sales coverage and processes (to ensure the quality, independence and exhaustiveness of the research) are universally important.  So is the impact that an analyst firm has on deals.

Individual traits include: bringing unique insights to the table, being easy to deal with, delivering value to end users and vendors with each interaction, and understand user needs whilst providing tangible real world benefits.

In the second of this series of blog posts, the coveted “Analyst of the Year” and “Analyst Firm of the Year” will be announced.

Methodology

1) Entrants:

This survey was open to anyone who works in analyst relations in any country, either in-house or at an agency/consultancy. In order for someone’s entry to be validated, they had to submit their email address and company name to verify they not an impostor trying to distort the results. This personal information will not be distributed or used beyond sending copies of the results to all participant. The survey was open for specific period of time and IP addresses were taken to ensure that someone could not vote twice.

2) Questions:

The survey specifically focused on an individual’s perception of the analyst world. A full list of every analyst house was made available for respondents to select their preference.

3) Segmentation:

Respondents were asked to specify their submissions based upon geography and segment. Based upon these criteria further analysis could be made of the results to identify specific regional or segment champions.

If you have any questions or comments about this survey please contact me (@jonnybentwood)

This post is also published on the Institute of Industry Analyst Relations (IIAR) blog and Technobabble.

@jonnybentwood

One of the great sports of recent times has been to make fun of Jonny Bentwood and his passion for industry analyst relations.  In fact analysts have always been easy if not fair game, after all it’s their job to forecast the future and give people advice on serious amounts of money and why they should spend it in a certain way.  Clearly a profession that is asking for a ribbing and one that it got in the fall out from the dotcom forecasts.  So in a world where as we know Trust in experts is in precipitous decline who would be bold enough to stand up as such an expert?

Well fortunately for the technology industry many very smart people are happy to don the domed forehead of industry analyst-dom.

However, even though they pertain to be font of all knowledge when it comes to IT – they have tough times ahead. In a similar manner in which media has witnessed a battle to keep its market with the growth of easily available content on the web, analysts have also had to adapt or die.  In this battle where their IP is what they have to sell, they have had to face three distinct challenges:

  • How to make their content better than what is freely available on the web.
    Solved by adding unique value by deep knowledge of market trends and being truly independent.
  • How to become more visible in a noisy and crowded environment so their voice and opinion can be heard and consulted on.
    Solved by an aggressive adoption of social media to increase their share of voice in technology conversations
  • How to tackle in enterprises the reduction of discretionary spend in this tough economic climate.
    Solved by adapting their business models to provide more tactical solutions with clear metrics as oppose to generic forecasts and strategy.

Despite these challenges, the analyst market is robust and remains strong.

One intuitive explanation for this growth is that as technology becomes ever more pervasive then the need for brain boxes to analyse its use and role grows accordingly.  However, there is another explanation that can be found in the Trust Barometer and that is that Industry and Financial analysts have been one of the expert groups to retain trust as a credible source of information.  In caparison the trust in CEO’s fell to only  29% last year.  The only other group to hold its head above water were academics.

This is all fine but it does leave the question as to what analyst have done to earn this trust ‘privilege’ after all they have not always been seen as independent to man (or woman).   In search of some insight I spoke to the martyr of the cause Mr Bentwood himself.

Clearly that’s just one man’s view but I would love to hear other thoughts as to why industry analysts have this trust privilege and indeed do they deserve it?

Jonathan Hargreaves (@Naked_Pheasant)

Everyone knows that Twitter is huge. Not a day goes by without another story showing how it saved someone’s life, broke a news story first or has fundamentally changed the way we think – its growth and entry into everyday life could justifiably allow its usage to be called (in technobabble bingo) a ‘paradigm shift’.

The questions I have been debating focus on growth. Specifically:

  • Does news fuel growth in Twitter or does uptake fuel news?
  • Do analysts (as supposed ‘fortune tellers’) get it right and are they ahead of the curve or mere sheep?
  • Why is this important?

To answer these questions, I have looked at my favourite community of analysts. With a little help from Carter Lusher’s analyst twitter directory as well as my own research, it has been possible to monitor the uptake of analysts on Twitter.

One of the fortunate aspects of using analysts as the criteria for this search is that there are very few closed communities that we can easily track growth in – if you know any let me know and I’ll add them to the table.

The graph below shows the growth of analyst participation on twitter, compared to twitter in the news (as shown by Google Trends) and unique visitors to twitter (as shown by Compete).

Growth of analysts on twitter

Does news fuel growth in Twitter or does uptake fuel news?
Not surprisingly the two are well connected – with a clear conclusion that in the early part of this year news significantly drove new visitors to twitter.

Do analysts (as supposed ‘fortune tellers’) get it right and are they ahead of the curve or mere sheep?
Analysts appear to be ahead of the curve. Whereas there is still a clear relationship between their uptake on news/growth they still seem to be slightly in front of the trend.

Why is this important?
It is an analysts job to understand technology trends. Obviously sometimes they get it wrong but if they get it right and predict that we should be using product x as it will be the next big thing – then, I will use it too. Our role as communication professionals is to engage with our key audiences no matter where they have these discussions.

The recommendation I would make is that we continue to monitor what the analysts predict are the major changes in how people use social media. There is a great advantage in being an early adopter of a product – such as being a trusted participant. Whereas we do not have time to try and test every new solution, there is lot to be said by watching analyst behaviour – if they are using a new solution then maybe we should too. Maybe we should be taking Jeremiah’s advice and look to get ahead in the areas of social colonization, context and commerce.

Jonny Bentwood (@JonnyBentwood)

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