February 2010


Marisa made some really interesting points recently about “young people today” and the way they think.  It got me thinking and I wonder if anyone can identify with what I’ve noticed.  Remember the days when you could remember phone numbers?  You knew all the important people by heart. 

Remember the day when you could remember addresses? They were logged in your memory.  What about birthdays? You could recall all the most important ones easily…you just knew which day they were on.  Well it’s either my age (I’m 34 – nearly) or it’s my younger days catching up with me, but I just don’t seem to have the buttons any more to remember this kind of stuff.

My theory is that because of my mobile, because of my social networks, because of Outlook – I have a mind muscle which I’ve allowed to wither away to nothing.  I’m not sure I care, but it’s interesting to note all the same.  What on earth might I prioritise and deprioritise in terms of memory in ten years time?  Will I need virtual prompts for the names of loved ones too?

This came to light when a friend of mine asked when a mutual friend’s birthday was.   We knew it was in March, we just didn’t know when; yet I’ve known this mutual friend for twelve years.  We have decided it’s the mutual friend’s fault as she’s not on Facebook, and therefore we don’t get the automatic reminder.  She’s not playing the game.  I need those automatic reminders of when the most important events are happening that I have completely forgotten about.

Am I alone in this?  Is it age?  Is it a general trend?  Or am I just a bad person? Or are we all beginning to rely on the Mind of the Machine?  This looped me back to the rather lovely classic by N-Trance, which I’d like to reference as my closing point.  N-Joy.

@MattJHurst

A recent study directed by David Nicholas at the University College of London showed that young people are losing their ability to concentrate because of the internet – as if, on hitting adolescence they don’t already have enough to deal with?

 

The study showed that adolescents are losing the ability to read and write long text because the internet is changing the way they think compared to older volunteers. Over a three year period researchers asked hundreds of 12 to 18 year olds to answer a series of questions by surfing the internet.

 

The results were interesting if not predictable.  The majority of adolescents viewed half the number of web pages as the older volunteers.  According to Professor Nicholas, 40% of those who participated in the study did not consult more than three web pages from the thousands available and rarely viewed a site more than twice.  

However, people who were educated before the age of the internet tended to relate back to previously viewed pages more often and go deeper into the details instead of jumping from one page to another.

 

It seems that there is evidence that the internet is changing the way the youth think because it encourages users to view multiple sources of information instead of from one traditional source such as a book.  Based on the study, this new “associative” thinking has left the young with the inability to read and write at length because their minds are being rewired by the web. This sits alongside the long suggested divide between ‘digital natives’ and ‘digital immigrants’.

I recently went back to school and got my MBA.  While researching for various projects I couldn’t help but think how lucky I was to now have the internet.  Whoever remembers the dewy decimal system and reading book after book to source materials for that 20 page term paper understands my excitement.  I can imagine that the internet is increasing the potential for our youth to have lower attention spans, but novels such as the Harry Potter or Twilight series have had phenomenal success.  They are long texts and teenagers have no problem flying through them. How does this sit in relation to the above study which suggests attention spans are reducing?  

What do you think?  Is the internet changing the way we think?

Marisa Mittelstaedt

With all the talk around the importance of trust and credibility, especially in relation to brands and celebrities, why is it that the advertisers responsible for creating campaigns for leading cosmetic brands choose to ignore these lessons and continue to use post-production techniques to enhance products, giving the illusion of unachievable results?

The main culprit usually getting into hot water with the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) as well as regularly receiving public condemnation is L’Oréal. Opting to use disclaimers that are vaguely legible on most of its promotional materials, lines such as “enhanced during post production” or “styled with natural inserts” are all too familiar to the cosmetics giant. This is now standard practise in product advertising for many cosmetic brands and L’Oréal is by no means an exception.

A couple of the most recent cases include the L’Oréal Elvive Full Restore 5 advert which features Cheryl Cole, along with her false hair extensions. During the advert, a message flashes on screen for fewer than two seconds out of the 30 second advert to alert viewers that Cheryl’s hair is ‘styled with some natural extensions’. The ASA rejected viewer complaints about the inability of achieving the same results as the disclaimer was apparently clear and legible, and did not break any rules. Procter & Gamble brand, Olay, also recently received viewer complaints for airbrushing Twiggy in the Olay Definity Eye Illuminator advert. As the product claimed it could help women achieve ‘younger looking eyes’, the ASA ruled that it could be deemed as misleading.

So what effect does what can arguably be described as misleading advertising have on consumer perceptions of such brands? Edelman’s 2010 Trust Barometer suggested that in the UK especially ‘a company I can trust’ (72 per cent) is the top driver for corporate reputation in the UK, followed also by ‘high quality products and services’ (62 per cent). This being the case, one would assume that public opinion and trust in cosmetics brands would have diminished – but surprisingly not according to sales figures. L’Oréal in particular reported that its profits beat market predictions in H1 FY09, and global demand for products continues to increase. It seems consumers are not ready to stand-up to these brands and continue to strive for perfection, no matter how deceptive adverts continue to be. 

The ASA published a health and beauty survey towards the end of last year which reported that 95 per cent of cosmetics adverts comply with regulations. Ironically the five per cent of adverts that breached the code were identified to contain a lack of sufficient scientific evidence to back up claims, exaggerated claims about the efficacy of products, or contained misleading claims. Surely more than five per cent of adverts could be included in these categories? 

These brands should take more responsibility for the messages they develop and align them correctly with product capabilities instead of making unachievable claims. Or is it up to the ASA to tighten regulations and critique adverts before they go on air? Or maybe it’s up to consumers to stop buying in on ridiculous claims?

@LucyDesaDavies

I’m glad to say that my predictions for the key themes at this year’s Mobile World Congress (2010) – smartphones, operating systems and applications – were spot on the money.

Truth to be told, you hardly had to be Nostradamus to predict the headlines for this year’s Congress. Device vendors are desperate to retain brand and consumer loyalty (especially in the face of operating systems becoming a bigger draw than handsets themselves), mobile operators want to ensure they get a slice of the application action and don’t get relegated to dumb pipe status while software vendors including Google & Microsoft see an opportunity for land grab in a global mobile market buoyed by an application obsession.

Underpinning this gold rush for customers and content is the need to move quickly and painlessly to LTE/4G networks. Data and download revenues are what will drive the next 10 years of the mobile market, and for that to happen quickly Joe Public needs to have a compelling user experience to convince him to keep buying applications, watch streamed video and download music. Of course, faster networks also give all parties license to develop new services and business models that rely on a lightning fast data connection.

To all of the above, GSMA head honcho Rob Conway has declared 2010 the ‘year of the developer’ while Vittorio Colao, chief executive of Vodafone has compared where the mobile industry is now to the start of the last decade when a lot of the heavy lifting on GSM was being carried out. Indeed, the headline coming out of this morning’s keynote session was “Dawn of a new era.”

I rarely get carried away with hyperbole but this time I think the industry luminaries have got it spot on. The mobile industry is witnessing an unbridled consumer desire for data services driven by devices that are turning on the non-techies as much as the real mobile geeks.  And it’s here, where all parties co-operate and clash in a battle for awareness, loyalty and lucre, is where the real interest lies for me.

About two years ago I was working with a mobile phone OS vendor and a leading handset manufacturer. Both co-operated (i.e. devices ran the software) yet in briefings with separate senior execs it was clear that both companies were at odds in terms of what the overall purpose of the phones were, who they were aimed at and how they would be marketed.

I suspect this scenario has been replicated right across the mobile sector. Carriers and handset makers coming to blows over their own application stores, OS vendors and software developers quarrelling over what competing services are allowed ‘on deck’. The realisation that customers no longer buy phones based purely on brand/tariff and carrier has sent everyone scrambling for loyalty, mindshare and the “killer app”. I think the next 12 months are going to be fascinating.

For me, the power now lies in the platform. That’s not to say the device vendors or operators aren’t going to play an important part in how the market shapes up – they will, massively. However, I feel the impact of the iPhone has thrust platforms into the limelight and they will drive the market, certainly in the short term. The industry seems to agree judging by the amount of companies from all sides of the industry that have signed up to the GSMA’s Wholesale Applications Community (WAC), an alliance designed to allow developers to easily create and port applications to ALL mobile operating systems…apart from Apple of course.

I’m also expecting a “platform” that currently isn’t in the mobile space to make a play for market share. Facebook could easily smash a hole in the handset market by launching a proprietary phone (likely based around Android or a Linux shell) that appeals to the social media obsessed generation. In fact, if you consider that in the UK alone nearly half of all mobile data sessions are Facebook generated I’d be surprised if conversations with one of the smaller handset guys aren’t already underway. After all, Facebook doesn’t charge for its mobile applications and while its advertising revenues are handsome, they’re still modest in comparison to most larger media companies. When you consider that over 70% of its ad revenue comes from local advertising, the power of having a platform that is always ‘local’ (the mobile phone) starts to look very compelling indeed.

And we can’t discount Microsoft in all of this. In the mobile wilderness over the past few years, it staged a Lazarus-like comeback with the announcement of its new Windows Mobile 7 OS yesterday. While handsets won’t be available until around Q4 this year, you can’t rule it out making inroads back into the smartphone market. Consumers will certainly be keen to find out more about its Zune and Xbox Live integration.

So where does this leave the handset guys and carriers? In a word, innovation. It’s going to force them to look at all aspects of their business to see where they can innovate – from the seemingly mundane like pricing to sexy next-gen services like Mobile TV. My own client Orange [client] is certainly forging ahead with this approach, embracing the platform-focused consumer mindset. I’m sure its competitors are too.

And I’ve definitely seen the handset guys step their game up this year. 2009 was all about big bright screens – with not much thinking about the user experience if we’re honest – but 2010 seems to have been about the whole package. Samsung’s Wave finally seems to have gotten the right balance between stunning hardware and a UI and OS that consumers will want to use (again, based on its own Bada platform) while SonyEricsson has revisited the mini mobile concept with usability and software front of mind. Motorola [client], HTC and LG have also demoed some really nice kit, but kit where the platform gets almost as equal billing at the technical specifications.

And that’s a trend that will continue – marketing that focuses on the platform as much as it does the hardware. The example of miscommunication between software and hardware companies that I cited earlier could still occur but I believe there has been a realisation, albeit one that is acknowledged mostly in private, that consumers are being turned on by the software first and foremost.

I’m confident this platform-led approach will lead to a golden era of innovation in the mobile market. Do you agree?

@paulwooding1973

Operators dominate the list of most ‘engaged’ tweeters across the globe, accounting for over one-third of the top twenty slots in Edelman’s Telecoms TweetLevel index rating 1,000 of the world’s most active Twitter users. Using a specially developed algorithm, Edelman tracked tweeters against a range of criteria including the interest that their posts generated amongst their readership and their involvement with the Twitter community.

In terms of Twitter ‘engagement’ (how actively the tweeter participates within the Twitter community) T-Mobile USA takes first spot, with Vodafone in second, followed by Vodafone UK (3rd), 02 (5th), Optus (6th), Voafone New Zealand (9th) and Telstra (10th) in the global index.

Jonathan Hargreaves, Managing Director of Edelman’s Technology Practice, Europe, Middle East & Africa, describes the ‘engagement’ ranking as particularly significant as it reflects the level of two-way interaction, involvement and relationship generated through Twitter.

Operators are not primarily using Twitter to simply broadcast messages or promotions – as would be revealed through TweetLevel’s ‘influence’ rating, where operators are not actually significantly represented – but to engage and interact with their communities, in many cases on a purely one to one basis.

In a particularly tough economic environment, Twitter has come to represent a strategic weapon to build and reinforce customer loyalty and – importantly – consolidate ARPU (average revenue per user) volumes.”

Telecoms TweetLevel

Edelman has also developed a Telecoms TweetLevel focusing specifically on telecoms-related content which revealed the internationalisation and language-independence of the platform as a communications medium, with commentators from Brazil, Indonesia, France, as well as English-speaking countries such as UK and the US represented in the top ten tweeters in terms of ‘influence’.

Jonny Bentwood, Edelman’s Head of Strategic Analysis, created the algorithm at the heart of the TweetLevel.

We used over 30 metrics to create the algorithm behind the index. Unlike most rankings that look merely at the number of followers someone has, TweetLevel gives you a really clear picture of who is important within this increasingly influential forum

There are four result metrics:

  • Influence – what you say is interesting and many people listen to it. This is the primary ranking metric.
  • Popularity – how many people follow the commentator
  • Engagement – how actively the tweeter participates within the Twitter community
  • Trust – whether people actually believe in the content

Each score is rated out of 100 – the higher the score, the more important the commentator is in Twitter terms. The rankings and scores were taken on 4 February ’10 and are subject to change over time.

The top ten Tweeters identified in terms of overall influence in telecoms were (in descending rank): @chrisbrogan; @jeffpulver; @techcrunch; @om; @jeanlucr; @jowyang; @Scobleizer; @ndorokakung; @abduzeedo; and@9swords

Edelman’s Telecoms TweetLevel index is being published on the eve of the telecom’s sector’s largest conference, Mobile World Congress (Barcelona, 15-18, February ’10), where the agency will be supporting a number of clients including Samsung, Motorola, Microsoft and HP.

Edelman’s TweetLevel can be accessed at http://tweetlevel.edelman.com/. To view the top telecom influencers identified by the report, go to http://twitter.com/Edel_Telecom/top-telecom-commentators. You can also view the list on below.

About Edelman Telecommunications

Edelman is known for its global telecommunications and wireless expertise, working with companies in every realm of the telecom sector from established wireless companies to emerging VoIP providers and infrastructure pioneers.  To learn more and engage, please follow our team at www.twitter.com/edel_telecom.

Account Influence Popularity Engagement Trust
1 chrisbrogan 77.4 75.9 78.1 83.5
2 jeffpulver 77.3 82.8 82.8 77.3
3 TechCrunch 76.4 91.5 7.7 94.7
4 om 75.4 91.1 59.1 79.9
5 jeanlucr 75.2 76.7 43.9 80.8
6 jowyang 74.6 71.2 55.8 78.2
7 Scobleizer 74.2 75.4 70.5 84.4
8 ndorokakung 72.7 56.4 65.7 78.7
9 abduzeedo 72 69 45 77.2
10 9swords 71.6 65.9 51 72.6
11 kogure 71.1 80 65.1 68.5
12 prsarahevans 70.8 68.4 57.2 69.7
13 nobi 70.5 79.7 54 69.5
14 mathewi 70.1 60.9 56.7 71.4
15 tsuda 70 68.1 8.7 67.9
16 ryan 69.9 66.7 66.7 68.7
17 adamostrow 69.9 63.4 52.4 69.9
18 brett 69.6 60.9 53.9 71.3
19 gizmodojapan 68.8 61.9 9 69
20 parislemon 68.6 62.2 50.7 64.9
21 Shoq 68.5 56.9 48.3 78.2
22 earcos 68.5 73.5 52.4 69.2
23 info_plantao 68.4 64.9 2 77.2
24 fshin2000 68.4 79.5 56.1 61.9
25 arrington 68.3 65.3 49.6 65.4
26 mattsingley 68 67.7 61.1 63.7
27 link_estadao 68 60.5 37.6 72.1
28 gonzague 67.9 56.8 65.5 63.8
29 mikebutcher 67.9 61.9 51 65.8
30 sitepointdotcom 67.8 71.3 10 68.6
31 theiphoneblog 67.8 65 40.2 69.8
32 andysowards 67.7 60.9 51.9 65.3
33 xguru 67.7 59.2 75.3 59.8
34 Cardoso 67.6 64.2 62 81.6
35 olhardigital 67.4 67.6 8 69.8
36 suadd 67.3 80.1 46.4 63.1
37 IDGNow 67.2 65.3 9.3 78.9
38 jmatuk 67.1 60.4 60.4 64.6
39 tokuriki 67.1 79.5 49.4 62.9
40 wakooz 66.9 75.4 42.5 64.3
41 arturoelias 66.8 63.7 48.9 66.4
42 ndtv 66.7 62 3.3 72.4
43 taromatsumura 66.6 79.4 50.2 64.4
44 forrester 66.5 67.7 46.9 66.2
45 kotoripiyopiyo 66.4 80.3 62.2 58.3
46 ekozlov 66.3 70.2 42.4 60.1
47 charlesarthur 66.3 60.1 69 59.1
48 alt1040 66.1 60.8 1.3 72.4
49 ManiKarthik 66 64.6 52 72
50 ruskin147 65.9 61.7 55.8 60.6
51 taeuk 65.9 50.8 77.9 58.4
52 nwjerseyliz 65.9 59 71.9 56.8
53 gannotti 65.9 69.6 59 61.4
54 karaswisher 65.6 87 70.1 66.6
55 apisanty 65.6 51.3 54.4 62.9
56 taguchi 65.4 80.5 49.5 66.6
57 sasakitoshinao 65.2 64.5 43.3 67.1
58 simonleung 65 74 78.5 53
59 CaliLewis 65 70.9 44 69.9
60 erickschonfeld 64.9 60.8 53.9 60.4
61 eldarmurtazin 64.8 56.4 68.3 60.1
62 harrymccracken 64.5 62.7 54 58.3
63 BenParr 64.4 61.6 56.6 68.2
64 htc 64.2 76.9 55.9 62.1
65 ollehkt 64.1 61 69.3 53.7
66 dotmotion 63.9 55.5 64.1 57.4
67 RicardoZamora 63.8 59.3 76.3 63.2
68 TMobile_USA 63.8 68.2 85.1 58.4
69 viteker 63.8 48.5 64.6 57.9
70 Ihnatko 63.7 66.3 59.6 66.3
71 Pogue 63.7 91.4 45.7 80.8
72 nickellis 63.6 57.5 65 65.8
73 renailemay 63.6 52.2 64.8 54.9
74 yak 63.6 51.2 45.9 59
75 stilgherrian 63.6 53.7 51.2 56.3
76 joshuatopolsky 63.5 60.1 57.6 58.4
77 HeadlinesIndia 63.2 58.3 47 72.1
78 jasontryfon 63 66.7 64.3 53.6
79 Korben 63 57.4 56.4 67
80 AlFerretti 62.9 69.9 56.1 64
81 aulia 62.4 50.7 63.5 54.2
82 marilink 62.4 74.5 58.5 61
83 lonniehodge 62.3 68.5 49.4 54.8
84 japonton 61.9 53.9 68.9 54.9
85 Pistachio 61.9 69.6 47.5 61.8
86 masason 61.8 74.7 34.6 72.8
87 ejacqui 61.8 54.7 60.2 53.3
88 akiyan 61.7 78.6 61.4 53.2
89 ClaytonMorris 61.7 64.1 55.4 61.5
90 ericmessa 61.6 52.2 54.5 55.3
91 delicious50 61.5 62.3 0.7 66.1
92 tsuruaki 61.1 55.7 44.2 52.6
93 budip 60.8 52.1 50.4 56.3
94 VodafoneUK 60.7 58.6 83.1 53.7
95 olyapka 60.5 52.6 72.5 59.6
96 gray_ru 60.4 53.6 64 54
97 O2 60.4 62.3 82.8 51.3
98 tim 60.3 55.9 50.4 55
99 hisa_kami 60.3 52.4 53.9 50.9
100 geekpage 60.3 55.1 61.5 46.4
101 petezin 60.1 53.4 51.9 54.4
102 reckless 60.1 52.6 46.7 54.8
103 ba_anderson 59.8 53.5 53.6 54.9
104 zsafwan 59.7 60 52.3 50.6
105 LanceUlanoff 59.7 62.3 41.5 61.2
106 elisanajera 59.7 46.9 69.8 53.1
107 iwaonakayama 59.6 53 42.4 53.6
108 Phonedog_Noah 59.4 58.7 60.3 59.9
109 futurescape 59.4 44.8 60.3 53.7
110 bbgeeks 59.3 65.6 74.1 45.5
111 andylim 59.3 47.4 68.6 50.9
112 jorcervan 59.2 50.6 55.5 54.1
113 boxbyte 59.1 52.6 50.2 52.5
114 bangwinissimo 59.1 46 51.4 55.1
115 Gartenberg 59.1 55.5 57.9 58.9
116 svartling 59 56.4 47.2 52.8
117 stagueve 59 49.2 59.9 53
118 garotasemfio 58.9 61.1 43.4 52.7
119 Shingi 58.8 49.6 63.8 54.1
120 geekdotcom 58.8 55.8 8.7 54
121 gletham 58.7 50.6 52.5 50.6
122 BTCare 58.7 53.8 83.3 49
123 gillianshaw 58.7 53.2 60.1 50.9
124 SOCIALMEDIAPRO1 58.7 68.1 10 61.3
125 phonescooper 58.6 51.5 53.7 50.6
126 panda_2009 58.6 52.7 50 46.3
127 ujeani 58.5 48.9 75.9 43.4
128 dani_escalante 58.3 52 46 54.9
129 tekusuke 58.2 52.6 51.3 43.3
130 vodafoneNZ 58.2 56.2 77.6 52.2
131 Rex5652 58.2 42.9 50.8 55.6
132 mobilezeitgeist 58.1 52.6 41.9 53.4
133 Verizon 58 55.6 46.6 60
134 poderpda 57.9 50.1 61.9 52.1
135 loekessers 57.9 48.4 55.1 50.1
136 davesnyder 57.9 63.3 56.2 47.2
137 tpb 57.8 62 10 52.6
138 ForbesTech 57.6 65.9 43.7 59.1
139 webdicas 57.6 68.4 47.5 50.4
140 anamsa 57.5 44 42.2 49.6
141 BW 57.4 53.2 4 63.9
142 fugita 57.4 53.8 45.4 50.5
143 mahadewa 57.3 56.6 60.2 47.8
144 shady 57.3 44.2 42.5 52.6
145 h_gocchi 57.2 41.6 59.7 46.3
146 jasonkincaid 57.2 55.6 49.7 48.6
147 ApplisiPhone 57.2 51.8 39.8 61.3
148 JulioAlonso 57.2 54.3 54.8 61.1
149 bobbiejohnson 57.1 56.8 50.8 47.7
150 fromedome 57.1 54.3 52.6 54.2
151 pluggdin 57 49.7 41.3 54.7
152 m4gic 57 48.2 46.1 49.6
153 arturogarrido 57 53.3 51.3 48.6
154 peterrojas 56.9 61.5 56.2 47.6
155 markevans 56.8 54.7 40.5 50.6
156 PCWorldBrasil 56.6 54.3 8.3 63
157 tatadocomo 56.6 57.6 65 47.8
158 GautamGhosh 56.4 52.9 59.1 53.7
159 saschasegan 56.4 54.8 58.6 47.7
160 jurino 56.4 46.3 52.5 46.3
161 FoneArena 56.3 49.2 59.8 54.3
162 teltarif 56.2 48.1 7 53.4
163 june_ya 56.1 44.6 50.2 46.4
164 gsohn 56.1 51.3 36.9 50.6
165 Gartner_inc 56.1 64.7 38.9 58.3
166 TelecomNZ 56 55.1 75.8 48
167 vendeesign 56 53.3 41.9 58.4
168 ojbaeza 56 47.8 50.5 48.1
169 JonoH 56 51 60.4 50.2
170 deantak 55.9 53 37.4 48
171 philippe_lagane 55.9 52.1 49.1 47.9
172 takashi_ohmoto 55.8 44 46.3 47.6
173 zpower 55.8 49.3 54.1 48.1
174 nokiabrasil 55.7 61.9 33.3 57.4
175 jasonkintzler 55.5 59.9 51.2 44
176 CiscoSystems 55.4 64.8 47.3 56.8
177 alexanderfog 55.4 54.7 9 42.3
178 willcom_blog 55.4 49.7 70.8 43.2
179 Optus 55.4 50.4 80 46.9
180 ibnlive 55.3 55.4 35.4 54.5
181 WilHarris 55.3 62.7 47 55.6
182 sonymusic 55.2 61.7 42.4 57.6
183 Aura_ 55.2 52.1 59.1 52.1
184 dsmpublishing 55 72.2 10 44.1
185 rahuljrark 54.9 64.4 47.5 52.8
186 hyoromo 54.8 41.2 59.9 42
187 johnbiggs 54.8 53.4 59 48.3
188 monsieurlam 54.7 52.4 2.7 53
189 g1tecnologia 54.7 63.2 4.7 52.7
190 LarryWentz 54.6 77.8 61.9 49.4
191 pandemia 54.6 60.6 33.9 47.2
192 ClinicEscort 54.6 46.5 49.4 53
193 rcadden 54.6 45 53.4 45.3
194 omendoza 54.5 46.4 57.6 45.3
195 antonello 54.5 51.7 48.4 46
196 android_info 54.4 51 8.7 48.1
197 briian 54.4 54.6 41.3 43.2
198 nyt_tech 54.3 56.7 0.3 55.4
199 jkendrick 54.2 47.5 54.7 47.1
200 Plastidecor 54.1 53.7 59.7 51.7
201 telediariomty 54 49.1 1.3 54.1
202 alextootchie 54 42.6 43 50.5
203 rafaelziggy 54 53.8 45.4 46.1
204 nixxin 53.9 48.8 57.5 42
205 Oracle 53.9 61 43.4 59.9
206 Braiden 53.8 68.6 10 52.9
207 waltmossberg 53.8 67.8 52.4 49.4
208 yoris 53.8 48.7 46.7 52.3
209 robroc 53.6 46.8 44.7 46.2
210 rampok 53.6 47.8 45.1 46.5
211 ramyaprajna 53.5 46.4 59.9 45.3
212 brokenbottleboy 53.5 46.3 56.6 43.4
213 hpnews 53.4 61.3 36.7 46.9
214 dailysocial 53.4 48 44.6 49.8
215 JournalDuGeek 53.3 53.4 5.3 57
216 patphelan 53.3 54.1 51.1 40.9
217 Economic_Times 53.3 54.2 3.7 59
218 LuisGyG 53.2 51.6 58.5 49.2
219 Orcon 53.2 47.7 68.5 46.5
220 SeanDonahoe 53.2 68.6 10 51
221 implu 53.1 69.8 41 48.3
222 meddlesome 53.1 43.5 44.3 47.1
223 bloggerkhan 53 68.7 10 42.5
224 GregKumparak 52.9 49.7 48.4 49.1
225 kaposlogisztika 52.8 55.3 36.8 45.6
226 sprint 52.8 62.2 38.5 47.5
227 mnetto 52.8 47.8 48.9 43.2
228 jet12345 52.5 62.6 34.4 45
229 clashcityrocker 52.4 48.8 62.4 40.3
230 TNTPR 52.4 52.6 40.9 56.7
231 CatrionaPollard 52.3 49.4 48.5 49.2
232 uol_tecnologia 52.3 59.2 4.7 53
233 HTC_Ru 52.3 52.3 65.2 50.6
234 afterDIGITAL 52.2 46.1 71.1 38.5
235 acidolisergico 52.2 45 60.1 41.1
236 BlackBerry 52.2 70.4 53.6 58.6
237 rodriguezhernan 52.1 45.2 56 42.5
238 Enderle 52.1 57.3 41.9 54.4
239 CHIP_online 52.1 56.2 9.3 51.3
240 riccardowired 52 60.9 46 52.4
241 ComputerworldBR 52 52.2 5 59.9
242 kuniara 52 36.7 48 41.8
243 veriserpa 52 44 38 47
244 Vonage_Voice 52 51.6 65.3 48.2
245 aaronabber 51.9 71.2 55.5 36.8
246 kapkap 51.8 47.7 8 40.8
247 neofreko 51.8 43.3 52.2 42.4
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260 nagaimichiko 51.1 47.2 46.7 39.1
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266 jr_raphael 51 54.5 51.6 48.2
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268 ldignan 50.9 52.7 33 42.7
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270 weeklyascii 50.8 55.3 37.7 41.7
271 sunmicrosystems 50.7 60.3 41.5 44
272 cynarar 50.7 46.5 51.9 40.6
273 Keziakarol 50.7 49.2 59 44
274 FortuneMagazine 50.7 62.5 36.1 53.4
275 seankovacs 50.6 47.2 62.4 47.8
276 hindustan_times 50.6 46.8 4.7 46.4
277 iskw226 50.6 50.4 37.8 31.9
278 nokia 50.5 62.6 29.9 56
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280 tenz 50.5 44.4 51.8 38.7
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282 hiroyuki_ni 50.5 66.7 33.9 48.8
283 stephenconroy 50.4 53.9 41.8 41.9
284 peternowak 50.4 43.4 48.8 46.7
285 dancosta 50.4 50.8 37.5 42.3
286 barijoe 50.4 41.5 57.8 44
287 murianwind 50.3 42.3 42.5 40
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289 michaeljoel 50.2 47.7 48.9 42
290 maynaseric 50.1 67.9 56.1 40.6
291 iPhonfr 50.1 52.9 5.3 52.4
292 ecom131 50 62.8 36.3 37.3
293 sknn 49.8 35.1 52.2 40.6
294 chip_de 49.8 50.1 8.7 41.5
295 lichtkatze 49.8 31 41.9 44.5
296 livemint 49.7 50.7 3 45.6
297 blackberrybr 49.7 50.9 47.1 42.6
298 hannibalrex 49.7 46.1 41.6 47.1
299 MikeGCSI 49.6 52.1 50.3 47
300 PhoneDog_Aaron 49.6 45.3 47.5 48.1
301 daccot 49.6 50.1 43.8 31.1
302 MindTalk 49.5 68.3 10 46.1
303 susumu_fujita 49.5 66.2 40.9 46.8
304 vealmince 49.5 41.6 52.5 40.9
305 spencer_stachi 49.4 36.5 51.1 40.3
306 la12primero 49.4 39.2 40.7 41
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308 alpew 49.2 40.3 61.9 38
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310 DickDeals 49.2 68.9 42.6 43.2
311 exameinfo 49.2 49.1 8 46.2
312 JulianatDerby 49.2 42.9 8.3 46.2
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314 mobiFlip 49.1 44.8 50 44.3
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316 dangrabham 49 44.2 53.8 38
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326 nutzareus 48.4 42 56.1 34.7
327 MobileCrunch 48.3 51.8 0 56
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332 Knuttz 48.1 50.8 50.5 42
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337 lucadebiase 47.9 50.9 33.3 40.2
338 isartom 47.8 38.3 47.2 39.9
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340 ryanlawler 47.7 45.5 40.9 37.3
341 i4r 47.7 46.4 52 29.8
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343 uwebaltner 47.5 46.1 41.2 37.1
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345 shaneschick 47.5 44.5 36.4 40.6
346 MarkHOV 47.4 37.2 54.5 40.7
347 GordonKelly 47.3 47.9 50 41.2
348 techflypaper 47.3 50.5 7.7 39.1
349 ingluisjimenez 47.3 39.5 48.2 38.3
350 Telstra 47.3 47 76.3 33.3
351 mocoNews 47.2 48.5 2.3 49.3
352 uriondo 47.1 44.1 38.9 36.8
353 SerhiyMakarenko 47 38.8 49.6 42.5
354 jojiphilip 47 40.3 41.3 40.1
355 dataqualitypro 47 47.1 52.6 36.3
356 erwinboogert 47 41.4 53.1 37.1
357 SamsungBrasil 47 54.2 51.1 40.5
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363 TechPolicy 46.7 50.3 38.6 42.1
364 lostremote 46.7 47.2 6 49.1
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366 JTeeter1 46.6 62.1 10 40.4
367 IPTelevision 46.5 48.5 8.3 42.9
368 UnoAmericaTips 46.5 46.7 37.7 39.7
369 Goston 46.4 42.3 40.1 37.8
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374 susiweaser 46.2 46.1 43 30.9
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376 fundacionTef 46 45.1 5 46.1
377 ClareHopping 46 40.9 45.9 40.8
378 itm_mobile 45.9 51.6 8.7 38.9
379 francisfong 45.9 35.6 39.7 43.8
380 fedcomputerweek 45.9 46.6 7.7 38
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382 tomdunmorestuff 45.9 47 40.8 40.9
383 Skripnikov 45.8 37 47.9 45.1
384 shoinoue 45.8 43.3 51.7 43.4
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394 Motorola_BR 45.2 56.3 27.4 51.1
395 hojeemdians 45.1 44.2 4 39.3
396 orangemood 45.1 38.2 51.9 36.1
397 halliwellni 45.1 42.6 7.3 37
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399 cmendler 45 44.4 45.7 36.5
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403 vmahmud 44.8 38.7 52.3 33.9
404 FCC 44.8 82.4 29 51.2
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437 krestivo 43.4 46.6 46.1 27.6
438 andyzain 43.3 37.5 41.5 36.7
439 jkOnTheRun 43.3 48.1 0 43.5
440 fiberguy 43.2 40.9 43.3 36.5
441 android_france 43.2 43.2 2 39.2
442 tweakers 43.2 49.4 33.6 42.7
443 qhardy 43.2 42.6 27.3 38.8
444 begeek_fr 43.2 41.7 0.7 45.9
445 WebBasedApps 43.2 60 10 35.3
446 cnews_ru 43.1 37.6 4.3 37.5
447 LGdobrasil 43.1 53.7 52.4 34.2
448 lewispr_uk 43.1 46.3 35.5 37.4
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450 eetimes 43 47.4 0 38.6
451 alefung 42.9 41.7 37.4 26.9
452 washtechnology 42.9 44.3 7.7 33.6
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455 tomkeating 42.9 55.4 32.1 33.7
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457 techsavvy 42.7 46.1 5.7 31.8
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459 nicolamattina 42.6 46.3 37 26.1
460 VerizonCareers 42.6 52.1 35.7 39.6
461 zdnett 42.5 45.7 0 42.4
462 corpbusiness 42.4 42.4 33.2 34.7
463 FierceWireless 42.4 48.9 37.6 37.5
464 lou1960 42.4 60 10 24.3
465 claudineb 42.3 49.7 44.4 33.5
466 interop_events 42.3 49.9 36.8 32.5
467 Mainboardernews 42.1 38.5 26.4 38.8
468 KeithRParsons 42.1 38 52.6 33.8
469 montemagno 41.9 59 5.7 41.3
470 aramadge 41.8 45 45.6 27.1
471 toddogasawara 41.8 41.6 32.8 28.3
472 gareth_uk 41.7 32.7 58.7 27.7
473 Wi_FiMAN 41.7 51.3 39.8 37.3
474 Fidomobile 41.6 41.1 64.5 36.5
475 tomloverro 41.5 36.7 41.7 34.2
476 Light_Reading 41.5 42 4 38.7
477 artbrodsky 41.5 43.1 41.9 34.8
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479 granleese 41.4 44.3 37.7 26.7
480 krides 41.2 33.6 49.7 27.3
481 ECOTV 41.2 44.8 7.7 35.3
482 the451group 41.1 50.2 24.7 39.6
483 joannarobbins 41.1 63.9 10 24.1
484 riddle 41 42.2 36.5 25
485 StopChronicPain 41 66.9 10 28
486 VerizonNewsroom 40.9 48.9 41.7 32.4
487 alexfarber 40.7 44.8 41.1 36
488 nikilaus2005 40.7 37.9 35.6 24.1
489 CIObrasil 40.6 47.8 4 46.9
490 plund806 40.6 37.5 7.3 28.1
491 IPTV 40.6 40.1 32.3 34.4
492 alanburkittgray 40.6 45.9 49.5 25.3
493 shansell 40.5 56.7 33 37
494 technolustnews 40.5 40.4 24.2 34.8
495 BradStone 40.4 56.3 31.7 43.5
496 chriswidner 40.4 36.8 53.4 24.1
497 r_silveira 40.4 30.6 38.4 32.7
498 zavackiy 40.3 42.7 50.1 31.6
499 janovum 40.2 40 54.5 21.6
500 ClaroBrasil 40.2 65.3 3.3 44.7

Last week, an all too familiar story: Marisa, from the Barcelona office, had her husband come home from work with lousy news.  Due to an out of town workshop (on a Saturday!!) she would have to reschedule a well-planned dinner at St. Pau located seaside near Barcelona.  Normally Marisa is pretty flexible with these things but this was special – in 2008 St. Pau was awarded three Michelin Stars!

So, as Valentine´s Day approaches we wondered how many people are facing similar situations and how they plan to compensate their loved ones for their absence, especially those attending the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona from the 14-18 of February. Over 50,000 delegates and visitors are anticipated to attend this year’s conference and exhibition, which means many postponed celebrations and cancelled dinners – although hopefully not at three Michelin Star restaurants.

To keep with the technology themed Mobile World Congress we sent out a survey to find out just how people would use technology to compensate their loved ones in the event of their absence on Valentine´s Day. 

It turns out that women more often turn to one-to-one communications and men prefer to ‘broadcast’ their affections.  According to the survey, 59% more women than men would use Skype with video service or equivalent to call their partner and  67% more women than men would send a personal video message via email while out of town.  Male respondents to the survey invariably preferred the one-to-many approach with 70% more men than women proposing to dedicate a Twitter post to their other half.

The survey also produced some interesting country differences, with Spanish respondents demonstrating the highest levels of ingenuity with the use of newer technology; 50% of Spanish respondents would probably or certainly use Skype with video or equivalent to communicate their sentiments if absent on Saint Valentine’s Day compared to a global average of 29%, while over a third of Spaniards would send a personalised video from their mobile phone (compared to a global average of just 13%). 

The least romantic nation in technology terms is Ireland!  According to the survey, 67% of Irish respondents wouldn’t even send a text message to their partner if absent during Saint Valentine’s Day, against a global average of 42%.

It is clear that technology is embedded in our lives and according to our survey can play a key role in keeping your significant other satisfied in the event of an absence.  So, do you think that texting isn’t very romantic, but it is the thought that counts?  Have you or your significant other ever used technology in a creative way to show how much you care?  How would you use technology to communicate your absence on Valentine’s Day?

Josh Bernoff makes the pertinent point about Forrester, in the same bracket as other IP focussed companies like the New York Times and CBS:

the opinions of our analysts are our product

This is the basis of the sole argument that has made the Forrester ban all personal blogs covering topics related to their coverage area in favour of Forrester.com branded ones.

This post has two purposes, firstly I’d like to share my own opinion of this and secondly review the way that Forrester have handled it.

Forrester POV (taken and summarised from Josh Bernoff and Augie Ray)

  • Analyst opinions are are part of the content they create for their employers, who are in the content business.
  • It serves Forrester’s clients better to be able to get to all their blogs from one place
  • Clients will know the opinions of analysts that they see are part of the other opinions they read in our reports, in press quotes, and in everywhere else we talk.
  • Forrester analysts will all have their own blogs within the new platform, and this will continue to furnish a platform for sharing their insights and building individual reputations.
  • No truth in the opinion that Forrester might want to restrict individual brand building

Those in favour (largely taken SageCircle analysis)

  • For analyst relations teams with Forrester analysts ranked high on their lists, this new Forrester policy could be a benefit by decreasing the number of blogs that AR has to monitor.
  • Unlikely that analysts with personally-branded research blogs will quit  especially in this economic environment where job opportunities are still at a premium.

Those against (largely taken from ZDNet bloggers Dennis Howlett and Michael Krigsman)

  • It represents an epic E2.0 fail.
  • Previous blogging stars (such as Jeremiah Owyang and Ray Wang) brought in revenue to Forrester but were not rewarded for their efforts. This move reinforces the problem.
  • Forrester will lose star analysts over restrictive social media policy, but they already factored that into the plan
  • The Redmonk model of personal brand promotion combined with rock solid analysis/support for developers is proven as a business model. Can that be transmuted to the likes of Forrester or Gartner?

Those on twitter

  • Sometimes it is the analyst’s rep that is the draw. – David Rossiter
  • Quality of individuals underpins quality of expected firm – Veselina Buie
  • Should IP-based companies stop personal blogs?” No; should encourage cross-posting though. – Larry Hawes
  • Keeping all the IP in-house makes the most sense from a brand PoV. – IDC EMEA
  • Banning blogging dehumanises a company. I don’t only want to hear from the CEO/the ads. – Will Humphrey
  • Every company is IP-based – Joe Baguley

My opinion

Forrester are known to punch above their weight in social media. I am often delighted to observe that in a world where Gartner’s 800lb gorilla is the lead in most spaces, Forrester has proven itself a worthwhile competitor. Their hires have been both groundbreaking and successful. What Forrester did successfully is get the best in the industry to join them and contribute their IP to the brand.

What went wrong though was when the ‘individual brand’ left the ‘Forrester brand’. Suddenly Forrester lost its revenue stream from their celebrity cash cows. To solve this, Forrester changed its policy to a pragmatic – ‘lets bring everything under one roof approach’.

Shame on Forrester. They are known for being experts in social media and then get it so fundamentally wrong. In my opinion they made three fundamental mistakes:

  1. Sometimes the individual is more important than the firm. Blogging and social media is all about authenticity, transparency and engagement. What this policy has done has removed a degree of trust from these core values as it can appear that Forrester does not trust its authors. If Forrester doesn’t trust them, then why should the readership.
  2. They discounted the views and opinions of their readers. I didn’t really believe they expected it to receive the feedback and attention it did. Even though they responded with blogs, tweets and comments – there was no proactive announcement leaving them in fire fighting mode.
  3. I disagree with their view “If you’re creating content for a content company, that company ought to host your blog”. Edelman are an IP company but give me the flexibility to have this personal blog. I do not believe for a minute that it is confusion for Forrester clients (nor mine) to understand the link between my views and my companies nor find it difficult to find the way round all of Edelman’s blogs.

Balanced with this is the fact that Forrester gives consistently the best social media advice from any of the analyst houses and kudos to them.

When I first started blogging a colleague of mine gave me some advice:

Learn your voice

What Forrester have done is removed the personal voice and instead created a corporate personality-less series of blogs (or so I fear). Forrester needs to ensure that this voice remains and I am worried that the best social media analysts will not be recruited to Forrester in fear that they will lose their brand. It’s all well and good saying that they can do it behind a Forrester.com address but it shows they don’t trust their analysts.

I understand that for analysts their IP is their product but I strongly disagree that this reason is sufficient to stop personal blogs that talk about the same content. Trust your analysts to let their blog act your PR.

@jonnybentwood

Originally posted on Technobabble 2.0

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